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Full text of "Fifteenth Annual Report of The National Farm School November, 1912"

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Fifteenth Annual Report 




OF 




®J|^ Nattnnal 

NOVEMBER, 1912 
Farm School, Bucks County, Pa. 

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0PFENHEIM6LimS3^(9 

Distinctive 

Outergarments for 

Women, Misses and Qirls 



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fashion conceptions from Paris and Europe- 
an centres. 

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models. The low-price marking illustrates 
in the broadest degree the immeasurable 
advantage in our purchasing power for 
five stores. 



Chestnut and 12th Sts. 



FIFTEENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



o/ 



The National 
Farm School 



Farm School 
Bucks County 
Pennsylvania 



November, 1912 



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Officers of the National Farm School 
1912-1913 



PRESIDENT, 
JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF. 
4715 Pulaski Avenue, Germantown. 
VICE-PRESIDENT. TREASURER. 

HARRY B. HIRSH ISAAC H. SILVERMAN 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

A. H. FROMENSON 
407 Mutual Life Building, Philadelphia 

LOCAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF. President. HARRY B. HIRSIT, Vice-President. 

I. H. SILVERMAN, Treasurer. A. H. FROMENSON, E.recutive Secretary. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

(Having served consecutively for ten year*.) 

ADOI PH EICHHOLZ, HOWARD A. LOEB, I. H. SILVERMAN, 

MORRIS A. KAUFMANN. S. GRABFELDER, 

ARNOLD KOHN 

ELECTED TRUSTEES 

Term Expires 1913 Term Expires 1914 Term Expires 1915 

ALBERT J. RAMRERGER BARNETT BINSWANGER HART BLUMENTHAL 

W. ATLEE BURPEE SIMON FRIEDBERGER HORACE HANO 

HARRY FELIX HARRY B. HIRSH ALFRED M. KLEIN 

DANIEL GIMBEL ABRAHAM ISRAEL ISAAC LANDMAN 

JOS. N. SNELLENBERG, LEON MERZ BARNEY SELIG 

NATIONAL AUXILIARY BOARD 

LOUIS I. AARON Pittsburg, Pa. 

JULIUS ADLER Portland. Ore. 

MRS. JULIUS ANDREWS Boston, Mass. 

HENRY BEER New Orleans, La. 

I. W. BERNHEIM Louisville, Ky. 

HARRY CUTLER Providence, R. L 

NATHAN ECKSTEIN Seattle, Wash. 

HENRY FRANK Natchez, Miss. 

MAURICE FREIBERG Cincinnati, O. 

BERNARD GINSBURG Detroit, Mich. 

A.. HIRSHHEIMER LaCrosse, Wis. 

M. HORKHEIMER Wheeling, Va. 

ADOLPH LEWISOHN New York City. 

LOUIS NEWBURGER Indianapolis. Ind. 

E. RAAB Richmond, ^'a. 

EDW. E. RICHARDS Mobile, Ala. 

ALEX. SANGER Dallas, Tex. 

SIG. SICHEL Portland, Ore. 

SIGMUND SONNEBORN Baltimore, Md. 

DAVID STERNBERG Memphis, Tenn. 

M. WEIL Lincoln, Neb. 

HARRIS WEINSTOCK Sacramento, Cal. 

FERD. WESTHEIMER St. Joseph, Mo. 

A. YOUNKER Des Moines, Iowa. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



THE FACULTY 



JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, D. D.. President. 
JOHN HOSEA WASHBURN. Ph. D., (Gottingen), 

Director and Professor of Agricultural Chemistry 
WILLIAM H. BISHOP, B. Sc . (Mass, Agricultural College), 

Professor of Agriculture, Superintendent of the Farms. 
RAYMOND G. HILL (Delaware), Instructor in Physics and Mathematics. 
WALTER F. FANCOURT ( Kew Botanicail Gardens, England), Professor of Horticulture. 
GEORGE EATON, J«., Assistant Professor in Agriculture. 
MRS. CHARLES NIGHTINGALE, Instructor in English. 

WESLEY ^L■\SSINGER, V. S., Professor of Veterinary Science and Farm Hygiene. 
MISS HETTY ABRAHAM, Matron. 
MRS. CLARA BARNES, Assistant Matron. 
HARMAN KRAFT, Foreman, Home Farm. 
HOWARD F. YOUNG, Foreman, Schoenfeld Farm No. 3. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 



COMMITTEE ON SCHOENFELD FARMS FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Barnett Binswanger, Chairman Harry B. Hirsh, Chairman 

L€on Mer* Harry Felix Arnold Kohn Barnett Binswanger 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 
Alfrad M. Klein, Chairman 
Hart Blumenthal Arnold Kohn Leon Merz Bernard Sdig Harry Felix 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE HOUSE COMMITTEE 

1 H. Silverman, Chairman Leon .Merz, Chairman 

Abraham Israel A. J. Bamberger Jos. N. Snellenburg, Howard A. Loeb 

ADMISSION COMMITTEE 

Morris A. Kaufmann, Chairman 

Isaac Landman Alfred M. Klein 

PROPERTY COMMITTEE SUPPLY COMMITTEE 

Bernard Selig, Chairman Hart Blumenthal, Chairman 

Simon Friedberg Benj. Finberg Adolph Eichholz Harry B. Hirsh 

GRADUATES COMMITTEE 
Isaac Landman, Chairman. 
Hart Blumenthal Harry B. Hirsh 

FARM PRODUCTS 
Daniel Gimbel, Chairman 
Harry Felix Samuel Grabfelder 

LADIES' EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Associated with the Local Board 

Mrs. R. B. Schoneman, Chairman Mrs. Joseph Guckenheimer, Treasurer 

Mrs. Jacob Blumenthal, Secretary 

Mrs. A. J. Bamberger Miss Frieda Jonas 

Mrs. Isidore Raum Mrs. David Kirschbaum 

Mrs. Max Berg Mrs. A. M. Klein 

Mrs. David Berlizheimcr Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf 

Mrs. Hart Blumenthal Mrs. M. F. Langfeld 

Mrs. >rnrtln 'Ifisher Mrs. Julia Raab 

Mrs. B. B. Bloch Mrs. Henry Rosenthal 

Mrs. C. Davidson Mrs. Meyer Schamberg 

Mrs. Adolph Eichholz Mrs. 1. H. Silverman 

Mrs. Simon Friedberger Mrs. Meyer Sycle 

Mrs. Harry B. Hirsh 

Honorary Surgeon to the School, Sidney L. Olsho, M. D., 1700 Walnut Street, Phfla. 
Honorary Dentist to the School, L. I. Bernstein, D. D. S., 1901 N. 32nd St,, Phila. 
Honorary Oculist to the School, J. Chas. Knipe, M.D., 2035 Chestnut Street, Phila. 



"Go Forth and Possess The Land" 

Address by Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, D.D. 

Founder and President of The National Farm School, at its Fifteenth Annual Meeting 
FARM SCHOOL, PA.. OCTOBER 6, 1912 



In the fifteen years, that we have pilgrimed from the city 
to the Harvest Campus of the National Farm School, we have 
witnessed many changes in the school and grounds, change of 
and still more changes in the attitude of men view point 
toward our purposes. Much of what was yjars" regaSI 
at one time doubt as to the ultimate success of our ing education. 
undertaking has been converted into conviction, much of one-time 
opposition has been changed into support. 

To the student of modern thought, however, this change is not 
at all surprising. It is a part of the general drift of viewpoints 
that has, in late years, manifested itself with regard to the education 
of our young. All educational institutions have been subjected to 
searching investigations. This scrutiny has resulted in the charge 
that the elaborate and expensive organization, which our public 
schools represent at the present time, does not train our pupils 
for useful pursuits. It does not. in the main, prepare them to 
enter trades, industries, manual employments. It does not fit, by 
far, the largest number for the careers they are to follow in later 
life. 

It is but natural that this inadequate training in our public 
schools should reveal itself in the industrial unrest which is a 
characteristic of our day. The dissatisfaction and 
agitation manifested in all industrial centers are Unrest due in 
, 1 1 • r r r .1 ■ papt to imppop- 

DUt the seethmg of our unfitness for the exigencies tra'nina 

of life. Our dislike for manual pursuits but rep- 
resents our unfitness and unpreparedness for modern conditions. 
Our cities swarm with unskilled workers who are the flotsam 
and the jetsam of the industrial stream. Ready to go anywhere, but 
having no where to go, willing to do anything, but not knowing how 

5 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



to do one thing well. These are the people who figure in every half- 
baked economic panacea. They are the followers of every political 
party that promises quick wealth without work. They are the 
shouters on the street corners, who denounce the rich and wealthy 
of our country as marauders and brigands, whose wealth has been 
filched from the common people. 

Recognizing the danger from a continuance of such an inade- 
quate and inefficient educational regime, statesmen and men of 

leading are calling for correctives. Our public 
urge vocational school must be re-adapted to the life the vast 
schools as a majority of people is destined to live, and the 

education fitted to the normal life of the nation. 
We are an industrial nation, so vocational schools are now proposed 
as additional to the educational system. Schools of this type are 
found in Germany, where the pupils are trained from earliest years 
for the industrial era, in which they live. Furthermore, it is pro- 
posed that in every public school of our country, but especially 
and more particularly, in the rural and country schools of our land, 
there be introduced at once a course in agriculture. The universal 
demand is that farming be henceforth included in the curriculum 
of every schoolhouse throughout the land. 

Farming has thus within the lifetime of The National Farm 
School, been translated from a refuge for the despairing to the 

dignity of a career for the aspiring. Farming has 
comes a fore- become a profession, with more claims for man's 
most profes- respect, and, from a material and vital standpoint, 

more necessary and useful than law, medicine, the 
ministry or any others of the so-called learned pursuits. 

What is probably more remarkable still is the fact that the 

insistence on the introduction of manual training and agriculture in 

_ . . J our public schools, does not emanate from the 

The Qemand _ 

for instruction brain of the dreamer and the visionary, but, on the 

In farming contrary, from the most practical of practical men. 

comes from ^ ■' ^ ^ 

employers of It is the manufacturers, the men of affairs, the 

^^^°''- bankers, financiers, the business men, the presi- 

dents of railroads and corporations, who are urging upon the boards 
of education for a re-adjustment of their courses of instruction, that 
will teach their pupils the useful things instead of the 
ornaments, the luxuries of education ; that will teach them to know 
the voice of Mother Earth, rather than the language of Ancient 
Rome, that is dead, and of Greece, whose glory has vanished forever. 
So urgent is the need for a modification of our public school system, 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



that, at a conference of New York State bankers, as reported in the 
Nczv York Herald, a resolution was adopted, in which these finan- 
ciers called for just such a practical curriculum as indicated above 
to displace the "generation of educated loafers" which the false 
methods in vogue raised. 

By the introduction of farming as an integral branch of the 
educational system, much of the evil from which our present day 

society suffers will be arrested. Our country suf- . , j . 
■' , ■' And urged as a 

fers from an under production of food and ma- means of less- 
terials, hence the increasing cost of living and ening evils of 
provisions. Thousands upon thousands eat what 
others produce, who should themselves consume what their own 
hands have brought forth. 

Farming, when taught in the public schools, will mean more 
land un-'er tillage, more men and women planting grains and vege- 
tables, more chickens raised, more cows milked. 

It will mean more production, to meet the in- Farming re- 
, , . ^ , ^ duces cost of 

creasing ^'emands for food from a growmg popu- .. . 

lation. The economic law of supply and demand 

is inexorable, a larger number than now of producers must be busy 

supplying the demands of an enlarging body of consumers. 

The teaching of farming to the youth of our land will also mean 
a greater sanity of body and mind, among the people. Our popu- 
lation that threatens to become citybred, is in 
danger of onesided development: brilliant and areater sanity 
clever, but not well rounded and well balanced. of mind and 
No society can long be divorced from immediate 
contact with earth and growing things, and remain normal. It is 
not the natural way, and what is not natural is abnormal. We are 
a part of nature and so long as we live according to nature's laws, 
all is well with us. 

The application of the foregoing observations to our own 

national conditions, in the economic and industrial field, and 

to the mission of The National Farm School, 

1 • TUM 1 • 11 Farm School 

IS only too obvious. When this school was verifies the 

founded, the social and industrial conditions truth of these 

of our national life, which then called for 

correction, had not become so developed and pronounced 

as they have become in recent days. Within the last few years, 

we have seen the truths we then announced, verified in what has 

come to pass. The perils and the dire evils of the systems we 

allowe 1 to go unchecked, have been exposed within the last few 

months. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



While our National Farm School is not a sectarian institution, 
and while its doors have always been open to applicants of any 
Jewish people faith, its special purpose has been to solve the 
sufferers from problems confronting such of our Jewish people 
d i t i o n s in ^s live amid the squalor, the congestion, the un- 
ities, wholesomeness of our large cities. Our people are 
affected by the same laws that rule other people. They are oppressed 
by the same dire forces that weaken others. The influences of a 
vicious environment are apparent. Too few producers among them 
results in a shortage in the food supply and its consequent poverty 
and suffering. An unnatural manner of living results in a disregard 
for the decencies and privacies of life, which tends to breed 
immorality. The overcrowding in the cities brings upon them just 
that dire calamity that has recently become the disgrace and shame., 
not only of New York City, but also of the entire nation. Israel, 
that has maintained through the centuries a reputation for purity 
and morality, is shamed by the recent revelations in the Ghetto of 
New York. 

This unnatural way of living, of overcrowding more families 
in a flat or tenement than is decent, results in w^resting the inhab- 
The result of itants of the Ghetto from a sane, wholesome and 
overcrowding a normal life, and produces the defective, the 
lie philanthro- dependent, the deficient, and, in this class, crawl 
py- the defeated, the despairing and the despondent. 

All these classes of people are deflections from the social order; 
the penalty for these is the large number of institutions that 
continually increase the burden of our charity organizations. 

One economic law has permitted the congestion in the Ghetto 

to lay its foundation walls ; by another economic law must these 

same walls be razed. That economic law is already 

Farm School a operative. It is by that law that the Farm School 

hopes to exert a considerable influence upon those 
ening evils. ^ ,. . 

most affected by the present conditions prevailing 

in our overcrowded cities. One man on a farm is worth one hun- 
dred in a sweatshop. 

When the Farm School was founded, one purpose was to 
forestall much of that misfortune which has since come to light 

in almost all large cities. The hope was strong 
the Farm within us that men of influence and wealth would 
School to stem realize the baneful outcome of such misery as 

befell the people of the Ghetto, and aid us in 
curing it. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



The question we may well ask now is this : Have we suc- 
ceeded? Has this National Farm School shunted the dweller of 

the congested districts into the channels that lead 

• 1 1 TT • J J /• Have we suc- 

to countrysides? Have we mduced many of our 

people to go back to the farm? 

Our answer is : We have started the farmward tide. Ours 
was no amateur's game to bring to pass a complete change of mind 
and heart on the part of so many people. It meant, 
for the overwhelming majority, a complete upset- what we have 
ting of deeply rooted conceptions of livelihood, done, 
even to entertain the desire to return to the 
soil. We had to encounter the inherited prejudices of centuries, 
and to make due allowance for an utter unfamiliarity with the voca- 
tion of farming, due to enforced century-long divorcement from 
the soil. In urging upon the Jewish people to hearken again to 
their ancestral calling, amid new ways and in these new lands, 
there were few to encourage us, fewer still who had faith in this 
method of economic salvation. But, we persisted, and results show 
that we have prospered, and we have been able to remain alive unto 
this day, because our aim was right. The changes wrought within 
the last fifteen years in the state of affairs in our own land, and in 
the changes in the outlook of men, are additional assurances that 
we w^ere right from the start. 

Within these fifteen years, we have established an institution 
that is valued at a quarter of a million dollars. We have graduated 
a hundred and sixteen pupils, who are now 
engaged in farming. Besides those who gradu- 
ated, a large number of our students were here 
only on part time, from six months to two years 
and more, and most of these are also engaged in agricultural 
work. Among our graduates are specialists in the employment 
of the United States Government, instructors of agriculture in 
public and private schools, a few managers of large estates and 
plantations, farm foremen, as well as farmers of their own acres. 
We take the natural pride of a parent in referring to the excellent 
work done by some of our graduates, who are engaged in expert 
investigations, making for themselves a reputation and thus 
proving benefactors of the human race, by their discoveries. 

Ours was the gigantic task of popularizing a hitherto un- 
known and certainly untried career. We have succeeded in 



Id THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

making people think about it, and look with 
What we had more favor upon the work undertaken. We 
to do. have the school, the graduates, and the support 

of a constituency. 

But these achievements on the ledger are counterbalanced 

by the deficiencies. After the demonstration of our usefullness 

and vital need in the national economy of the 
What we , ... 11,1 1 

might have people, our mstitution should be ten times larger 

done if proper- than it is, our school vaster in range of influ- 
ly supported. ^-^^ r ^ ^.u 

ence, radiatmg a far greater power upon the 

people of our country. This National Farm School would 
be a mightier institution to-day, had the support been ac- 
corded it which a school of agriculture of the character of ours 
justly deserves. We have had to fight for our existence from 
the very start. The objectors were as plentiful as thistles on 
fallow land, and we have had to banish them, one by one, and 
many yet there are to be overcome. 

It is objected that this school costs too much money to run, 
notwithstanding the fact that we have shown again and again 

that it costs us only a dollar a day per student. 

Objection on ^o educate, feed, lodge and clothe. We have 
the score of ... . . , , , , 

cost answered authoritative statistics to show that propably no 

similar institution in our land has a per capita 

expense as low as ours, which, besides giving an education supplies 

its students with all their needs. 

It is objected that we are fostering a separate school for 

Jewish boys — we are not. This is a mistaken and unwarranted 

Objection on error. The National Farm School is non-sectarian. 

the grounds It has been attended from the very start by non- 
that we are ^ n t mi o r t-. 1 • 

sectarian ans- Jews as well as Jews, i he State of Pennsylvania 

wered. would not give our institution an appropriation of 

$10,000.00 a year if it were sectarian. 

We hear that the school is not needed, because in every state 

of the Union there are splendidly equipped state agricultural 

^.. ^. ^. ^ colleges, where any student, who wishes to take 
Objection that . 

our school du- up farming, can attend. 

tu'tions ans- Those who offer this argument to discount 

wered. the purpose of our school, have only the slightest 

knowledge of the requirements for admission into state colleges 
and are basing their comments on hearsay evidence. This is ramp- 
ant superficiality, and should not be offered in good faith by any 
one. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 11 

To enter a state agricultural college, a student must first have 
passed through the High School. A college education is even 
urged. In addition, he must have means to provide for 
his board and lodging, for his clothes and other needs. At 
the Farm School, boys are entered from the grammar schools ; 
some of them have not even attended an American school, and 
nearly all of them are w^ithout means. Many of them come to us 
from homes of pinching poverty and from the congested sections 
of our large cities. They are received at our institution, if prop- 
erly qualified, and not only are they educated for a self-maintaining 
career, but while they are with us, they are boarded, lodged, clothed 
for a term of four years, without any cost to them. 

But this rebuttal does not silence the critic. It is still claimed, 
by Jew as well as non-Jews, that farming is not a career which 
the Jew can follow. This fallacy dies hard, but 
evidences are now too plentiful to permit this ^^ gi^j error 
calumny to continue. An elaborate article, in the laid low. 
American Jezvish Year Book of 1912, on the 
agricultural activities of the Jews, shows how extensively the Jewish 
people are attracted to farming. In most every state in the Union 
are Jewish farmers and a like declaration can be made after con- 
sulting our own records. 

But these disheartening misconceptions have retarded the 
progress of the school. We have had to engage in a campaign of 
education and teach people the truth about the without these 
Jews willingness to farm and the particular part misconceptions 
of our school in efifecting this. It has been our progress would 
experience that when the subject of the Farm be greater. 
School is personally explained to any one, his interest is aroused, 
and as a rule he becomes enthusiastic over it. No greater assur- 
ance is required than this, to convince anyone that men are inter- 
ested in the mission of the Farm School, when this is properly 
presented. 

But from the very first, we have had to go, and must this very 

day, go forth and tell people our purpose and the nature of our 

work, all of which has been attended by an 

enormous expense. Hundreds of thousands of What was done 

letters, pamphlets, circulars, have had to be issued. ... 

'^ '^ public. 

Lecture tours had to be gotten up. Newspaper 
and magazine articles had to be written and published. Any cessa- 
tion from this incessant campaign results in a falling oflf of 
membership. The only means of retaining those enrolled, is to 



12 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

canvass in person or by mail, and to repeat our appeal for support. 

We have this year secured the services of Mr. A. H. Fromen- 
son, who is to engage in propaganda work. We trust that the 
friends of the Farm School will cordially receive 
A new execu- ^i^' wheresoever he happens to go, and accord 
tive secretary, him the attention and hearing, both his qualifica- 
tions as a speaker and executive deserves, as well 
as the cause which he represents warrants. 

The conviction has been gradually ripening that the work of 
the school would be greatly furthered and that the people would 
A national have more solid faith in the mission of this 
President in- enterprise, were the president of the school not a 
president minister. Whether justly or not, there is in the 
wanted. mind of the people a vague notion that a minister 

is a lesser kind of dreamer, and, almost as a rule, an impractical 
man. When such an one is found directing the destinies of an insti- 
tution, there is considerable misgivings as to its real value It is 
possible the Farm School has reached a stage when its presiding 
officer must be one who can wholly devote himself to it, who, as a 
college president of any academic institution, must be engaged in 
administering the affairs of the college and that only. The time is 
ripe for the appointment of a business man, as president. Such a 
man can direct the destinies of the school better than a professional 
man. He will command the attention and respect of the business 
wor!d more than a professional man. He would be more apt to 
gain co-operation in the organization of local branches elsewhere, 
and in many other ways, further the interests of the Farm School, 

That the Farm School has succeeded so admirably, is due in 

large measure, to the able and generous assistance of the Board 

of Directors, composed as ours is, of merchants 

Farm School's ^^^ manufacturers and professional men. In the 

. , ,. ^ same connection, the unselfish work of the Ladies' 

able directors. 

Auxiliary Board has been a factor in promoting 
the welfare of the institution. We have always felt encouraged 
to call upon the National Advisory Board to assist us in the man- 
agement of the school and consulted with them in the endeavors we 
were launching. *****:!< 

The growing desire for the life of the farmer has been shown, 

not only by the eagerness to join the Utah Colony, but in the 

organization of many similar colonial associations 
L.3rci6r en ro l~ 
ment calls for throughout the country, and particularly in Detroit, 

more land to Cleveland and St. Louis, which associations have 

appealed to The National Farm School for 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 13 

direction and guidance. This has also been shown by the unpre- 
cedented appHcation of students, averaging, very often, five a day, 
all of whom had to be rejected, because of lack of facilities to 
accommodate them. Our student enrolment being larger 
than ever, enforces the conviction upon us that we are 
in need of larger acres. We need more land to cultivate — we must 
raise larger crops — we should have more cattle. The more students 
in our institution, the more need there is for live stock for them 
to handle, all of which means that there must be more land at our 
disposal. 

More especially are we in need of Experimental Farms of the 
Max Schoenfeld Memorial Farm idea. By means of his generous 

gifts we were enabled to buy adjoining farms, one 

, 1 1 , , J 1 More expen- 

of them to be worked by advanced students or mental farms 

graduates, whereby they were to acquire thereon of t*ie Schoen- 
the experience needful to run a farm profitably 
themselves, and to derive therefrom sufficient revenue to enable 
them to make part payment on a farm of their own. This plan 
has proved to be a means whereby quite a number of our graduates 
have started on farms of their own. We need more such experi- 
mental farms. During a visit this summer, to the grave of 
our late benefactor. Max Schoenfeld, we offered a fervent prayer 
that the Divine Hand that has thus far guided and aided us may 
raise for us another such benefactor as the one that was all too 
soon taken from us. ^^ * * * * * 

We are constantly adding to the equipment of our institution 
and have this year completed the ice house, the gift of Mr. Louis 
I. Aaron, of Pittsburgh, and we have erected a new 
smithy, in the construction of both of which, to a increase of 
large extent, student labor has been used. It is equipment. 
the policy of the school to employ the students 
in the various activities of a farmstead, to teach them the use of 
tools, outside of the farmer's sphere, such as carpentry and 
masonry. Our students have felled our trees and assisted in road 
building, and, wherever necessary, they have been employed where 
their work could be of benefit to the school and to themselves. 

Some income is realized from the sales made to wholesale 
houses of produce raised by our students. It is suggested that this 
income would be larger if these products were 
sold direct to the consumer in Philadelphia. But Proposed re- 
this would oblige us to open a store, employ help, tail store, 
hire a delivery wagon, involving an expense for 
which we are not prepared. 



14 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Yet, while we are not prepared to open a store for the sale 
of produce we are in the market for the sale of shrubs, bushes, 

evergreens, and ornamental trees. We sell these 
trees of our ^s cheaply as they can be purchased in any com- 
nursery for rnercial market and of a quality equal to the best. 

We furthermore plant them, and, if necessary, look 
after them. If our friends will give us their patronage for trees of 
this character, we will be enabled to enlarge our nursery, and, in 
time, it will provide an increased source of revenue. 

We have established the practice of planting memorial trees, 

in memory of friends of the school, and much of the arborial 

beauty of our roads and lanes is due to these 

Festive and memorial trees, which every spring are planted to 

commemorate some dear one called to eternal 
trees. . . . . 

reward. Following this practice we later instituted 
the planting of festive trees. This new feature has also met with 
favor. Of such trees, both memorial and festive, we planted last 
spring 115 and dedicated a lane, known as the Max Schoenfeld 
Memorial Lane, leading from Schoenfeld Farm Number One to 
Schoenfeld Farm Number Three, to the memory of the School's 
■.greatest benefactor, Mr. Max Schoenfeld. 

The life membership of the school has been increased by the 
addition of twenty-six ($100.00 each) making a total of 152. Their 

names are published in the Year Book. 
Life members The total individual membership of the Farm 

and donations. School at present is 1630 — a very small number 

indeed when one bears in mind the large number 
of Jewish inhabitants in our country. 

The Federated Charities of Pittsburgh remembered us with the 
sum of $500.00, that of Kansas City with $350.00, Indianapolis 
$200.00, Little Rock $200.00, Memphis $200.00, Milwaukee $100.00, 
St. Paul $100.00, Toledo $100.00, Nashville $75.00, Vicksburg 
$25.00 and Philadelphia $7500.00, amounting in all to $9350.00. 
This list unfortunately does not include such large cities as Chicago, 
Cincinnati, Cleveland, Baltimore, and Boston, and many other large 
centers of population. Having received from many of these cities 
a considerable number of students, it would seem to be only right 
that the Charity Federations of these respective communities should 
make some contribution towards their maintenance. 

Bequests from the estate of Annie M. Ferguson, Pittsburgh, 
Pa., Mina Friedman, Chicago, III, Benjamin Kahn, Philadelphia, 
Louis Lowenthal, Rochester, N. Y., Levi Stern, Philadelphia, Abra- 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 15 

ham Weiler, Columbus, Ohio, amounting in all to $1100.00 are 
hereby gratefully acknowledged. 

From various other sources special donations were received 
amounting to $3,200.00, details of which will be found in the Year 
Book and are herewith gratefully acknowledged. 

We desire to express our heartfelt thanks to the State of Penn- 
sylvania, for the valuable aid afforded us ; to our instructors and 
matrons for their patient and untiring labor; to 
the Jewish Hospital, for the kindly service ren- rnent to go 
dered our boys in hours of need; to the distin- forth and pos- 
guished speakers, who have honored us with their 
presence and participation in these exercises. At no time was this 
service more apparent than at the occasion of the public 
exercises last spring, which brought together an unusually large 
gathering of people. Men of national reputation, as well as men 
of local fame, honored us with their participation. Favored as we 
were by an ideal day, we were as equally well favored by the 
excellence of their addresses. At no time was the spirit of the 
exercises so elevated, and were the speakers so unanimous in up- 
holding the work of the Farm School. Coming as they did, at a 
time when the nation realizes the absolute necessity of a new ap- 
plication of farming as a means of correcting the abuses which 
have entered the Republic, the speakers, with one accord, hailed 
the advent of the school as one of the saving factors of our day. 
Never before was the country so roused to the need of vigorous 
farming, as one of the agencies most needed to perpetuate our 
heritage of freedom. And never before were we so convinced 
that our School was rooted in the firm faith that, in order to prolong 
our days in peace and contentment, we must GO FORTH AND 
AGAIN POSSESS THE LAND. 



16 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



THE FARM SCHOOL COLONY IN UTAH 



From the President's Message. 

The National Farm School has reached a second stage in 

its development. We are about to launch larger Establishing 

endeavors than have hitherto been possible. One colonies the 
, , . ^ , 1 advanced work 

of the primary purposes oi our school was to pro- of Farm 

mote the establishment of colonies, presided over School, 
by the experts trained in the science of farming, and managed in 
a businesslike manner. Colonies that have hitherto been founded 
have suffered from the lack of just such well trained men. Headed 
as these were, by persons motivated with the best intentions, but 
unfitted for the difficult undertaking, they did not realize their fond- 
est hopes because their leaders were unfamiliar with business 
conditions. The Farm School graduates have been trained to guide, 
as well as to teach a larger number of colonists. Its purpose is not 
merely to qualify a student as a farm manager, or provide him with 
a career. There has always been in the mind of the Board of 
Directors the possibility of establishing groups of people and 
families on tracts of land, who would be instructed and counseled 
in their pursuits by expert farmers. 

It is, therefore, with pleasure that we note the condition of the 
colony in Clarion, Utah, which is being directed by four graduates 
of The National Farm School. This colony, has 
purchased from the State of Utah 6000 acres on The Utah 
of three years. At present there are twenty-two Colony. 
which 150 families are to be settled in the course 
families, comprising a population of seventy-seven people, who are 
the pioneers of this settlement. The men of the colony, under the 
guidance and instruction of our graduates, successfully cultivated 
1500 of their 6000 acres, during the past year, and produced a crop 
so successful that Mr. W. W. Armstrong, the President of the 
Commercial Club, of Salt Lake City, has declared that the found- 
ing of this colony, under the direction of scientifically trained 
leaders, is the greatest event in the history of Utah during the 
year 191 1. The progress of this colony so far, proves the wisdom 
of the efforts of the School in training our graduates for the 
larger work that has always motivated the men who have built up 
this Institution, from the very beginning. It is confidently believed 
that our graduates are working out a plan at Clarion that is des- 
tined to overcome all the causes of failure of former colonizing 
attempts in this country and that the Clarion colony is to be the 
forerunner of many others. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 17 



WHAT WE DO WITH OUR LAND 



From the President's Message. 

In light of our appeal for more land, it seems strange that 
people should ask what we do with all the land we have 
at the present time. There are some who 
Oup Lands think that we should be self-supporting. Of 

and Our Crops, our 363 acres it must not be overlooked that our 
campus, our roads, our lanes for memorial trees 
and our grove, all withdraw a large acreage from actual cultivation 
and considering that we have green hands, that our boys are un- 
trained, unprepared, hence destructive of tools and materials, that 
when their service really becomes valuable it is time for them to 
graduate, and to give their skill to others, the surprise should be, 
that under such untoward conditions, we are able to do as much 
as has been done. 

The Director's Report will show that we have harvested : 

.119 Acres of Hay Yielding 250 tons 

9 Acres of Sweet Corn Yielding 25,000 ears 

10 Acres of Tomatoes Yielding 3,500 bushels 

10 Acres of Apples Yielding 300 bushels 

I Acre of Grapes Yielding 500 bushels 

13 Acres of Rye, Yielding 80 bushels; 8 Acres plowed in 
9 Acres of Oats, Yielding 235 bushels and 8 tons Straw 
4 Acres of Vegetables Yielding 5 tons 

61 Acres of Corn, Yielding 1,800 bus. and 250 tons silage 

8 Acres of Potatoes Yielding 700 bushels 

4 Acres of Pears Yielding 100 bushels 

8 Acres of Cowpeas Yielding 16 tons 

7 Acres of Wheat 100 bushels and 4 tons Straw 

1 Acre of Cabbage Yielding 5,000 heads 

2 Acres of Asparagus Yielding 400 bunches 

133,210 Quarts of Milk, of which 93,192 quarts were sold 
to the Jewish and Mt. Sinai Hospitals of Philadelphia. 



18 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENSES EXPLAINED 



From the President's Message. 

The entire income from all sources, state appropriations, Fed- 
erated Charities, bequests, donations and memberships has been 
$42,546.66 against which there was an expenditure of $44,206.06. 
This expenditure embraces the cost of lodging, clothing and other 
necessaries for one hundred and three boys, maintenance of the 
household, salaries of instructors, ofifice force and rent, keep of 
stock and cattle, light, fuel, water power, etc., etc. It also includes 
the cost of propaganda, as well as of necessary repairs, the erection 
of the ice-house and smithy, road building, and additions to our 
live stock and implements. We must especially caution our friends 
against dividing the whole expense incurred during the year, by the 
number of students on our roll. They are responsible for a por- 
tion of the expense. It is unfair to charge against them the cost of 
propaganda or to fail to give credit for the material additions 
to our assets. It is not to be forgotten that the National Farm 
School started with nothing and that its assets to-day are worth 
a quarter of a million dollars, and that the largest part of these 
assets have been derived from our annual income, either in money 
received or in crops raised. Our deficit for the year is $1659.40, 
making our total deficit, to September 30th, 1912, $9741.87. 

The expense of propaganda is naturally added to the legitimate 
running expenses of the institution, and must be included in figur- 
ing up the per capita expense of each student. 
The expense of ^^ ^s wrong however to charge against mainten- 
propaganda. ance of the student body an item which is not a 

part of the expense incurred in educating and 
sustaining them. A sense of fairness in the future should prompt 
the critic to deduct from the expense account of educating and 
maintaining the students the amount of money used in raising a 
large part of our income. 



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THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 19 

The Eleventh Graduation 

Farm School, Pennsylvania, March 5th, 19 12 



The departure of two of the students to join hands with 
several earlier graduates in the Jewish Agricultural Colony com- 
posed of 150 families at Clarion, Utah, makes the Eleventh Grad- 
uation at The National Farm School stand out prominently in the 
institution's history. The training of such leaders and teachers is 
the high public service The National Farm School aims to perform. 

Sixteen graduates passed out of the School at the exercises 
which were held in Segal Hall on Tuesday, March 5th, 1912. They 
were addressed by Rev. Dr. Jos. Krauskopf, President and 
Founder of the School, Adolph Eichholz, Esq., Dr. John H. Wash- 
burn, the Director of the School, and several members of the 
faculty. 

Full course diplomas were awarded to: 

Benjamin Druckerman Harry L. Ltibin 

David A. Friedman Jacob Minkowsky 

Julius Levin Benjamin Packer 

Morris Salinger 

and Certificates to : 

Maurice Berman Beryl Harrison Leon Tyor 

Arthur Bachman Jerome Levy Nathan Rosenberg 

Israel Gabriel Morris Lewis Nathan Lipschutz, 

The young men who departed at once for the Utah Colony 
to be joined later by Benjamin Druckerman. 

were : 

David A. Friedman and Morris Salinger. 

Two of the graduates, Jerome Levy and Julius Levin, pur- 
chased their own farms where they became reunited with their 
families. Four other accepted important agricultural positions in 
Pennsylvania, and the rest entered upon similar duties in various 
parts of the country. 



20 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

The Fifteenth Annual Spring Fe^ival 

Farm School, Pennsylvania, June 2nd, 1912 



One of the most successful Spring Festivals in the history of 
The National Farm School was held on the grounds of the insti- 
tution on June 2nd, 1912, when nearly seven hundred persons 
journeyed thither by special train to witness the brilliant exercises 
participated in by many prominent educators, rabbis, jurists, 
philanthropists and publicists. In the opinion of many who had 
the pleasure of attending other ceremonies and public functions at 
The National Farm School, it was a remarkable and inspiring 
manifestation of the growing public enthusiasm for the school and 
its purposes. 

Those who participated in the exercises were : Provost Edgar 
Fahs Smith, of the University of Pennsylvania; Prof. Edwin R. 
A. Seligman, of Columbia University; Hon. George B. Orlady, 
Judge of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania; Rev. Dr. Henry 
Berkowitz, of Philadelphia; Elbert Hubbard; Daniel P. Hays and 
Ferdinand Kuhn, of New York City, and Dr. Joseph T. Rothrock, 
Expert Arboriculturist, of West Chester, Pa. 

Judge Orlady was the presiding officer. In turning the gavel 
over to this distinguished jurist, Rev. Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, 
President and Founder of The National Farm School said, among 
other things : 

"I welcome you to the installation of a new freshman 
class of students — 31 in number— a cause for rejoicing, because 
that number is the largest ever enrolled in one season, but also 
a cause for sorrow, because that figure represents but a small 
fraction of the large number of lads who, on an average of six 
a da}-, clamor for admission to our school, but whose hearts' 
desire to fit themselves for the noblest of all callings, to 
redeem themselves from the bondage of the congested city, we 
must refuse, not having the room to house them nor the means 
to maintain them, our present enrollment of 83 students, taxing 
our capacity even beyond our limit." 

Tribute was paid, by Mr. Ferdinand Kuhn, to the memory of 
Max Schoenfeld, who, during his lifetime, had been one of the 
staunchest and most generous friends of The National Farm 
School, presenting to it most of its broad acres and many thous- 
ands of dollars. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 21 



"In one conversation that Max Schoenfeld had with me," said 
Mr. Kuhn, "I remember distinctly his saying: 

"You have your hospitals, your orphan asylums, your aid 
societies, your united charities, your settlements, but these 
societies, worthy as they are, do not solve the problem which 
becomes greater as each shipload of immigrants flows into a 
district that is already saturated far beyond its capacity. The 
crying need of the hour, indeed the only hope for the future 
lies in the creation of a distinct and powerful sentiment in 
favor of a healthy diversity of occupation and a proper dis- 
tribution away from the Ghetto. 

"These young men of the Farm School will become the 
forerunners of a movement that, once obtaining momentum, 
will convert the thousands. Each graduate will become a farm 
school in himself, a teacher who will surround himself with 
pupils who, in their turn, will become the preceptors of others. 
The seed thus grown will gradually ripen into a crop of 
Jewish farmers successfully tilling the soil in every agricultural 
State from Maine to California. Jewish farm colonies will 
find a natural growth and eventually the Jewish farmer will 
be in number proportionate to the total Jewish population." 

Following the reading of messages, the beautiful and impress- 
ive ceremony of consecrating trees took place. Representatives of 
the student-body reported that ninety-eight trees had been planted 
in memory of deceased friends, and seventeen white birch trees in 
commemoration of festive occasions. 

Dr. Joseph T. Rothrock, delivered the address of consecration. 

Mr. Daniel P. Hays, of New York, eulogized Mr. and Mrs. 
Isidor Straus, universally lamented victims of the Titanic disaster, 
in a special memorial address. He said : 

"This tribute is paid to Mr. Straus not because he was a 
merchant prince and a great leader nor because he exhibited 
courage on the ship, but because in his life he recognized the 
obligation he owed to his religion. He lent a helping hand to 
every worthy cause. He was a modest, simple, honest, genuine 
man, as all great men are. The scenes on the deck of that 
ship will be told again and again, and will never be old. The 
noble exhibition of womanhood must be recognized ; the tie 
that bound Mr. and Mrs. Straus together could not be broken. 
We who knew Mrs. Straus all said that she could not be 
saved if her husband was drowned. We knew that she would 
not leave her husband. We knew her as a mother in Israel 
Thank God that out of the gloom comes that light that makes 
for the nobility of human life." 

The Rev, Dr. Henry Berkowitz voiced a feeling eulogy of the 



22 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

late Rabbi Israel Aaron, of Buffalo, whose death four days after 
the celebration of the 25th anniversary of his ministry, cast a gloom 
over American Jewry. 

At the conclusion of this ceremony the Rev. William Armhold, 
the venerable cantor of the Keneseth Israel Congregation, recited 
the traditional Kaddish. Rabbi Isaac Landman gave prayer for 
the dead in English. 

Prof. Seligman's address was a brilliant discussion of the 
importance of agriculture to the economic progress of the nation. 

"In the rush of modern industry, we are apt to forget 
the importance still to be attached to agriculture, for agricult- 
ure, after all, is the fundamental basis of the entire industrial 
superstructure. When England became a vast industrial people 
she mistakenly allowed her agriculture to sufifer, with the result 
that England today but for its prodigious navy would be at 
the mercy of the rest of the world for the provision of its 
food supply and its raw materials. When a generation or two 
later the industrial transition took place in Germany, Germany 
acted more wisely in seeking to maintain and to retain some 
of its agricultural advantages. We, in the United States, are 
perhaps in no danger of following the example of Great Britain 
but the note of warning which has frequently been sounded of 
late must not be overlooked. However great industrially the 
United States of the future is to become a due regard for the 
ultimate welfare of the nation implies a conservation and de- 
velopment of its agricultural resources. . 

"Institutions like this which are helping to swell the num- 
bers of the future enhghtened farmers are building more wisely 
than they know; for they are helping this country not only 
economically but socially and politically. The well-to-do, in- 
telligent, businesslike farming class of the future in this country 
will form the political backbone of the nation and will continue 
to invigorate its social and political life." 

"Fra" Elbert Hubbard, the Sage of East Aurora, delivered a 
characteristic address, sparkling with epigrams, bubbling over with 
wit and humor and replete with wisdom, bringing the exercises 
to a close. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 23 

The Fifteenth Succoth Pilgrimage 

Farm School, Pennsylvania, October 6th, 1912 



Dr. Edgar Fahs Smith, Provost of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, Dr. Martin Brumbaugh, Superintendent of the Public 
Schools of Philadelphia, and William R. George, founder of the 
George Junior Republic, were the principal speakers at the 
Fifteenth Succoth Pilgrimage and Annual Meeting of The National 
Farm School, which was held in Segal Hall, on Sunday, October 
6th, 1912. In the absence, due to illness, of Dr. Krauskopf, Presi- 
dent and Founder of the School, Mr. Harry B. Hirsh, the Vice 
President, took the chair and introduced the speakers ; Rabbi 
Isaac Landman read the President's message, "Go Forth and 
Possess the Land," printed in another part of the report. 

Dr. Smith, in the course of a brilliant address directed to the students, 
epitomized the great value of scientific agriculture as taught by The 
National Farm School, saying: 

"Here you have an opportunity to get an education. You 
are away from all the distractions of the city and town, and are 
in contact with mother nature. About you there are objects 
which carry with them the greatest secrets. When these are 
disclosed, they open up such a fund of knowledge, fraught with 
so much pleasure that I have often wondered why we want to 
live within the narrow compasses of our city homes. 

"Learn the nature of the soil you are being taught to till. 
What is it? Of what is it composed? What is the nature of 
its components? This will bring you in contact with the 
science of chemistry. That science will help you to discover 
the composition of all materials. It is the science that will 
make clear to you the composition of the air you breathe, the 
food you eat, the water you drink, and the clothes you wear. 
A knowledge of that science will help you to determine what 
things will grow on a particular piece of soil, what that plant 
life about you, the potatoes, the beans, the corn, the wheat, the 
rye, the oats, these fruit trees and these shade trees, take up 
from that soil; and by means of that science you are going 
to learn what to put back upon the soil to restore it to its 
original power." 

Reports were submitted by the Treasurer, the Director, Pro- 
fessor Bishop, head of the Agricultural Department; Professor W. 
F. Fancourt, head of the Horticultural Department, and by Miss 
Hetty Abraham, the Matron of the School, all of which are 



24 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

published in this Year Book. 

After the distribution of prizes, Dr. Krauskopf was re-elected 
President of the School; Mr. Harry B. Hirsh, Vice President; 
Mr. I. H. Silverman, Treasurer and as members of the Executive 
Board for three years: Hart Blumenthal, Horace Hano, Alfred 
M. Klein, Isaac Landman and Barney Selig. 



Report of Schoenfeld Memorial 
Farms Committee 



FARM No. I 
Senior, Beryl Harrison, and Junior, Philip Amrum, are in 
charge of this farm. The crops have been better this year than 
ever before. Both of the young men have been most industrious 
and earnest in their endeavors. They have 8 cows, 2 horses, 50 
fowl, and have cultivated 15 acres of corn, 13^ acres of tomatoes, 
54 acre of potatoes, i acre sweet corn, 4^ acres of peas and oats, 
raised 3 acres of wheat and 10 tons of hay. 

FARM No. 2 
This is the fruit farm. The i6-acre peach and apple orchard 
has been reported on in the Director's Report. The 2 acres of 
asparagus, cut for the first time this year, yielded well for a young 
bed. The resetting of plants last year has filled the bed and the 
plants are strong and vigorous. The young vineyard set out last 
year, as a test of varieties on this kind of soil, is doing nicely. 
The plants have grown luxuriously and will produce fruit within a 
few years. The quinces, set out a few years ago, will begin to 
bear next year. The soil on this farm was in a very worn-out 
condition, when purchased. This year it has grown crops of grass 
and corn that are very creditable to the system of reclamation. 

FARM No. 3 
In rendering the fourth annual report of our stewardship of 
Flora Schoenfeld Memorial Farm Number Three, we beg to submit 
herewith for your consideration, a statement for a period extending 
from March ist, 191 1, to September 30th, 1912. This is due to 
the fact that we wish the closing of our fiscal year to conform 
with that of the Home Farm, and especially since the farmer's 
year ends with the harvest. During the period just mentioned, we 
have improved the tenant house and the silo. We have reclaimed 
an eight-acre field, which produced practically nothing, but which 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 25 

now gives promise of material results. We have grown a crop of 
cowpeas on it this year and a crop of rye will be sown this fall, 
to be plowed in next spring and will then be laid down to grass. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
March ist, 191 1, to September 30th, 1912 

GAIN 

Sale of Farm Products, (net) $5,258.85 

Interest Account Bank Deposits 20.75 

Inventory, September 30, 1912 3,574.60 

$8,854.20 

LOSS 

Conveyance $2 . 38 

Provisions 447-38 

Farm Supplies, (Including Inventory February 28, 191 1, 

of $1,236.50) 4,408.11 

Wages 1,024.5s 

Repairs 1 501.91 

P>mbing 12 . 50 

Improvements 

New Roofs 

Tenant House 296 . 37 

821.44 

Painting 35-40 

Sundries 50-83 

Storm Insurance , 

Horticultural Department i .80 

Fuel 1 6.75 

Cutting Trees 104.60 

Depreciation of Live Stock 500.39 7,921.60 

Gain, September 30, 1912 ,. . . $932 .60 

ACTUAL FINANCIAL STANDING 
ASSETS 

Inventor3^ September 30, 1912 3,574.60 

Real Estate 15,000.00 

Live Stock 1,855 .20 

Implements 836.62 

$21,266.42 

LIABILITIES 

Due Endowment Fund $2,000.00 

National Farm School 813 .92 

Bills Vouchered and Unpaid 199.89 

Capital Account 1911 $17,320.01 

Gain, September 30th, 1912 932 .60 

18,252.61 

$2 1 ,266 . 42 



26 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

While we have Habilities, aggregating $3,013.81, the value of 
the products on hand when sold, which include 100 tons of hay, 
5 acres of tomatoes, 5 acres of rye and sundry crops, will material- 
ly reduce this indebtedness. We have sold milk and other products 
to the value of $5,258.85. 

During our incumbency of this farm we have greatly im- 
proved the value of the land, by the constant application of fertil- 
izers and have enhanced the value of the property by the addition 
of farm buildings and by improvements to the tenant house. 

We trust that, during the ensuing year even more satisfactory 
results will be obtained and that, upon the presentation of our fifth 
annual report, our indebtedness will have been greatly reduced. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. BINSWANGER, 

Chairman. 



The Graduates' Aid Fund 



The Graduates' Aid Fund, founded by Mr. William Volker, 
of Kansas City, Mo., has for its object the building up of a fund, 
the interest of which is to be devoted to extending loans to such 
of the graduates of The National Farm School who shall estabhsh 
themselves on farms of their own. 

Contributions have been received from: 

William Volker, Kansas City, Mo , $150.00 

A. W. Benjamin, Kansas City, Mo 100.00 

Henry Hellman, New York City 200.00 

Barnett Binswanger, Philadelphia 50.00 

Adolph Eichholz, Esq., Philadelphia 50.00 

Benjamin Finberg, Philadelphia 50.00 

Hart Blumenthal, Philadelphia 50.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 27 

Report of the Treasurer 

For the Year Ending, September 30th, 1912 
Herewith is submitted the Treasurer's report for the fiscal 
year ending September 30th, 1912, which, upon analytical study, 
shows the following results. The net maintenance receipts, de- 
rived from all sources, aggregates $36,440.16, against an income of 
$38, 610.90 last year. This difference is due to the fact that the 
income from propaganda in 191 1 was included in the regular Dues 
and Donations Account, while this year it has been segregated 
under the heading of Extraordinary Receipts. Our expenditures for 
the maintenance of our boys, which includes board, lodging, cloth- 
ing, instruction, the cost of repairs to our implements, which, being 
handled by inexperienced hands of our students is, naturally, very 
large, the feeding of our stock, the upkeep of our property, taxes, 
insurance, etc., etc., is $35,280.72. Comparing this figure with 
our cost of maintenance for 191 1, which was $37,120.55, it will be 
seen that, notwithstanding the increased cost of the necessities of 
life, which has been felt throughout the country, the cost of main- 
taining our boys has been even less this year than last, showing 
that the institution is being conducted each year, more and more, 
on a systematic basis. 

It will be seen that the sale of our Farm Products has not been 
as large this year as in 191 1, due to the lateness of this year's sea- 
son. The value of the products on hand, however, and those not 
yet harvested will more than equalize the excess of 191 1 over 1912. 

The deficit this year including the extraordinary disbursements 
for improvements to our property, which adds to the value of our 
assets, and the very extensive propaganda conducted throughout 
the year is $1,659.40, making our total indebtedness to date 
$9,722.52. 

While the report shows that our propaganda expense for this 
year has exceeded our returns, I beg leave to call your attention 
to the fact that nearly all of the $6,106.50, received from this 
source, has been subscribed in annual memberships which can be 
counted on annually, for at least several years to come, with practi- 
cally no expense. 

During the past year, the sum of $4,749.25 in bequests, special 
donations, and life memberships, has been added to the Endow- 
ment Fund, making that fund total $88,760.31. It is hoped that 
next year at this time we may be able to report that the fund 
totals $100,000.00. Respectfully submitted, 

I. H. SILVERMAN, Treasurer. 



28 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

GENERAL FUND 

Deficit. September 30. 1912 $8,063.12 

RECEIPTS 

Dues and Donations, Net $9,622.00 

State of Penusylvania 10,000.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities 7,500.00 

income from Investments 3.727.75 

Sale of Farm Products 4,079.32 

Memorial Trees. Net 7fiS.38 

Festive Birch Trees, Net ■•• 66.00 

Library, Net 1-46 

Sundries 56.o0 

Year Book, Net 18.75 „„ , ^^ _ 

36,440.16 

EXTRAORDINARY RECEIPTS 

Propaganda 6.106.50 6,106.50 42,546.66 

" $34,483.54 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Interest 110.09 

Taxes 394.44 

Insurance 418.58 

Brooms and Brushes ."Vi.Ol 

Conveyances (Freight, Expressage, Telephone) 1,339.20 

Dry Goods 1,705.87 

Fuel 1.6fi4..36 

Groceries ' 2,071..36 

Lighting 579.76 

Plumbing 414..34 

Painting 358.79 

Provisions 4,465.72 

Rent 273..=i4 

Supplies— Educational 313.26 

Farm 6.729.40 

Medical 114.29 

Salaries — Matron 740.00 

Officers 1.525.33 

Teachers 6,1.39.23 

Wages 3,310.51 

Sundries 675.47 

Horticultural Department 683.48 

Spraying 202.80 

Eepairs _. 541.08 

Printing .375.81 

35.280.72 



EXTRAORDINARY DISBURSEMENTS 

Live Stock 60.5.05 

Pennsylvania Hall 115.28 

Repnirs, ac. Schoenfeld Farms, No. 1 and 2 4(;9..58 

Propaganda 6,720.78 

Ice House 501.45 

New Nursery 61 ..55 

Spring and Fall Exercises 214.62 

Garbage Funnel in Kitchen 23.90 

Blacksmith Shop 204.13 

• 8.925..34 44,206.06 



$9,722.52 



Deficit, Previous to 1908 36.59.90 

Deficit, 10r)8-1909 Pf!4.74 

Deficit, 1909-1910 1.904.93 

Deficit. 1910-1911 1,633.55 

8,063.12 
Deficit, September 30, 1912 1,659.40 9,722.52 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 29 

ACTUAL FINANCIAL STANDING 

September 30th, 1912 

ASSETS 



Due from Schoenfeld Farm, No. 3 $813.92 

Due from New Road account 24.05 



837.97 



LIABILITIES 

Due H. F. Bachman & Co 1,000.00 

Due Girard Trust Co 4 000.00 

Due Endowment Fund 4,559.75 

Students' Deposit Account 193.93 

Bills Vouchered not paid 806.81 

10,560.49 

Deficit $J,722.52 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

INVESTMENTS 

1st Mortgages, 5.4%— 323 N. Sixth Street $3,000.00 

1323 N. Seventh Street 3.000.0 

323 Washington Ave. and rear 

League Street 2,500.00.. 

2008 S. Tenth Street 2,000.00 

611 Lombard Street 2,000.00 

10.35 South Street 5,000.00 

2S71-73-T5 Tulip St 1,500.00 

Wolf Street Property 1,400.00 

S. E. cor. Marshall and Oxford. 3,-300.00 

2106 W. Norris Street 3,000.00 

601 Dickinson Street 4,000.00 

709 S. Eighth Street 2,000.00 

N. B. side Soth and Chester Ave. 6,000.00 

60 N. Fifty-fourth Street 1,800.00 

964 N. Second Street 4 500.00 

4170 Poplar Street 2,000.00 

1411 N. Wanamaker Street 1,400.00 

N. W. cor. 32nd and Berks Sts.. 4,000.00 

5 %_21.30 S. Tenth Street 1,200.00 

611 Pike Street 1,200.00 

5V.%— 305 S. Sixth Street 2,700.00 

1816 N. Marshall Street 1,800 00 

6 %— 224 N. Ohio Ave., Atlantic City.. 3,500.00 

117 N. Florida Ave., Atlantic City 2,600,00 

Market Street L 4s, 4% 5,000.00 

P. & R. 4s 4% 2,000.00 

Wisconsin Central 1st 4s, 4% 1 000 00 

P. R. R. Convertibles, 3y2% 5,000.00 

E. & P. 4s. 4% 2,200.00 

Participation Bond Mort. Trust Co., St. Louis, 5% lOO.OO 

Schoenfeld Farm No. 3, 5% 2,000.00 

The National Farm School 4,559.75 

87,259.75 

$88,760.31 

Bank Balance, October 1, 1911 $6,560.38 

RECEIPTS 

Abraham Weiler, Columbus, Ohio $200.00 

Annie M. Ferguson, Pittsburgh, Pa 100.00 

Louis Lowenthal, Rochester, N. Y 459.25 

Levi Stern. Philadelphia 100.00 

Benjamin Kahn, Philadelphia 190.00 

Mina Friedman, Chicago, 111 100.00 

1,149.25 

Special Donations — 

From a Friend, Philadelphia 1,000.00 

1,000.00 

Life Memberships — 

Mrs. Edward Bauman, Chicago, 111 100.00 

Mrs. J. H. Neustadter. San Francisco 100.00 

B. Kaufmann, New York 100.00 



30 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Ferdinand Hermann, New York lOO.nO 

P. J. Goorlliart. New York 100.00 

Julius C. Lang. SeMttle. Wash 100 (lO 

SiiiuuPl Levy, I'^ort Worth 100.00 

Simon Sturm. Cincinnati l(K).0fl 

Moses E. C.rppnelianm, Chicapo 100.00 

Isaiah N. Ilellman. San I'^rancisco lfM).00 

Mi-s. rii;irles W^ Itosenl)anm. San Francisco 100 00 

Mrs. llenr.v Newman, Xew Orleans IfKI.OO 

Marv .Teanette Mever, San Francisco 100 00 

P'ffincham ri. Morris, Pliiladelpliia 100.00 

M. A. Onnst, San Francisco 100.00 

Jlever Gottstein, Seattle 100.00 

Rel'ecca Oottstein. Seattle 100.00 

Samnel Klein. Cincinnati 100.00 

M. I.asker. (ialveston KKl.oo 

Emanuel Hill). Rochelle. Ill lOO.OO 

Mrs. R. S. Winkler, Buffalo ]00 do 

Samuel Westheimer. St. .Joseph lOdOO 

Daniel P. Ha.ves. New York KKl.OO 

Fred Rawitzer. Boston 100 01 

Louis H. Manko, I'hilndelpbia 10(iOO 

Charles E. Morris, Philadelphia 100.00 

2.600.00 

Princip.il on Mortgages — 

2:^1 7-10-2.'^ York Street $0.00000 

2414 Sed.fflev Avenue l.-^OO (|0 

2010 South Tenth Street 2.0011.00 

9.500.00 14.249.25 

$20,809.63 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Propaganda Expense $800.00 

Purchase of Mortgases — 

904 N. Second Street $4..'V10 00 

709 S. Eighth Street l..H^).(,o 

N. E. side .")th St. .ind Chester Ave O.ooonj 

60 N. Fifty-fourth Street 1 '-Mm 00 

4170 Pop'ar Street 2.00;).00 

Interest act. Rank Deposits to N. F. S 9 07 

1411 N. Wnnamaker Street 1,400.00 17.700 00 

National Farm School, act. Loan 800.00 19..'?09 07 

$1.500.o« 



SUNDRY DONATIONS 



Aschenbach & Miller, Philadelphia Medicinal Supplies 

Burpee, Mr. W. Atlee, Philadelphia 

Subscriptions to Papers and Magazines for Library 

Bickley, A. F. & Son, Ph'ladelphia Crate of Eggs. 

Binswanger, Miss Mona, Philadelphia . . Watermelon Treat for Household 

Chicago Israelite, Chicago Free Subscription 

Dill & Collins Co., Philadelphia Glazed Paper Used in This Boc'r 

Friedman, Mr. B. C, Philadelphia 60 lbs. Matzos 

Fleisher, Mrs. M., Philadelphia Books and Magazines for Library 

Guckenheimer, Mrs. Joseph, Philadelphia, 19 Volumes for Library 

Jewish Criterion, Pittsburgh Free Subscription 

Jewish Exponent, Philadelphia Free Subscription 

Jewish Review and Observer, Cleveland Free Subscription 

Jewish Outlook, Denver Free Subscription 

Klein, Messrs. A., & Brother, Philadelphia 35 lbs. Matzos 

Manischewitz, Mr. B., Cincinnati 100 lbs. Matzos 

National Farm School Sewing Circle, Philadelphia 

; Sheets, Pillow Cases, Towels, Napkins, Table Cloths, Waiters' 

Aprons and Coats, Laundry Bags, Spreads, etc. 
National Fruit Grower, St. Joseph, Mich Free Subscription 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 31 

The Director's Report 

The Student Body: During the past year we have given 
instruction to one hundred and three young men, graduating seven 
from our four years' course and giving certificates to the others 
for work in both theoretical and practical agriculture, some for a 
course extending over two years, and some over three years. 

It was possible to select the Freshman Class with more care 
than usual this year because the number of applicants for admis- 
sion was larger than ever before. Seventy-four are in the School 
at the present time. 

The Farm Work: The students have cared for sixty head 
of cows and young stock, twenty-six horses, swine, varying 
from twenty to a hundred in number, and poultry varying from 
two hundred to one thousand head. They have cultivated and 
harvested over 282 acres. They raised 61 acres of corn, 9 acres 
of sweet corn, 80 acres of hay, 10 acres of tomatoes, 8 of potatoes, 
16 of peach orchard, 10 of apple orchard, 4 of pears, i of grapes, 
8 of cowpeas, 13 of rye, 4 of wheat, i of cabbage, 4 of vegetables, 
2 of asparagus. Outside of our farm, we harvested 39 acres of 
hay, 3 of wheat and 9 of oats, which were bought for our use. 
When it is understood that all the work mentioned above is per- 
formed by students most of whom were never on a farm before, 
it speaks well for what they have acquired while at The National 
Farm School. 

Horticulture: The new location of the nursery has trans- 
formed a very prominent part of our grounds, and added to its 
attractiveness. It furnishes valuable instruction to our pupils and 
is practically self-maintaining. Over $200.00 worth of plants were 
sold from it this spring and the remaining stock is worth over 
$1,500.00. Our vegetable garden has furnished the Boarding 
House with $726.00 worth of produce, and we have sold about 
$50.00 worth of surplus. Our greenhouses have been a very val- 
uable laboratory for the pupils in horticulture. Greenhouses at 
most agricultural institutions are operated at a loss. Our green- 
houses, more than pay for themselves. We have received over 
$590.00 for cut flowers and tomatoes. The pupils have put in new 
wooden bottoms to the benches in the old houses during the 
summer and have painted all the sash and the outside and inside 
of the three houses. The vineyard has done well. The black rot, 
which was quite prevalent in former years, has been entirely con- 



32 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



trolled by spraying. There were grapes enough to preserve for 
winter use in the Household Department. The asparagus has done 
unusually well this year. 

The Orchards: The thirty acres used for apple, pear and 
peach orchard have been cared for by our pupils, with ever increas- 
ing interest. We have had a demand for men trained in orchard 
work, greater than we have been able to supply. The interest in 
renovating old orchards and the setting out of new ones, that has 
been felt throughout the country, is very apparent in our pupils. 
Several of our young men are making a specialty of this branch 
of horticulture. The new peach and apple orchard was well filled 
with buds last fall, but the exceptionally severe winter killed most 
of the peach buds, so that only a small amount of fruit was grown 
The trees are well set with fruit for another year and, with an 
ordinary winter, a good crop can be expected. The apple orchards 
have done well, although the crop is not as large as last year, this 
being the off year in this part of the country. 

Improvements: The building of an ice house has enabled 
us to store, from our lake, sufficient ice for all our needs. A 
blacksmith shop has been built, filling a long needed want. The 
repair of our wagons is facilitated by having the iron parts repaired 
and the tires set at home. This should make an important factor 
in our instruction in agricultural mechanics. The roads on the 
farms were improved during the month of August, when the crops 
did not require special attention. A new road of six hundred feet 
has been made from the peach orchard to the main road leading 
to Schoenfeld Farm No. 3. 

The Household : The care of the rooms in the dormitories 
during the past year has been good. The health of the pupils is 
excellent. A few accidents from foot ball and other games have 
confined a few boys to their rooms for short periods. We have 
had one case of appendicitis. The young man was sent to the 
Jewish Hospital to be operated upon and followed with a remark- 
ably quick recovery. The care of the house and the culinary de- 
partment has continued under the successful management of Miss 
Hetty Abraham and her assistant, Mrs. Clara Barnes. 

The cash receipts from the Home Farm amount to $3,826.85 
during the past 11 months. We have considerable hay, tomatoes 
and apples yet to be sold. The value of the products delivered to 
the Boarding House for the year is over $2,600.00. These amounts 
do not include the many tons of hay, corn, silage, and other crops 
held to support the farm animals during the winter.. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 33 

Agricultural Department Report 

Our Land : The crops of this year have been more uniformly 
successful than for several years past, A survey of our growing 
crops accompanied by the weight of the same, as harvested, will 
show our yields, per acre, are steadily increasing. This year's 
yields have never been surpassed. Continued applications of 
manure and fertilizers, better cultivation, better seed selection, are 
all showing results, but we have not yet reached the maximum that 
can be produced. 

We look for, and confidently expect to obtain, larger yields 
from our land with each succeeding year for some time to come. 
Our system of farming, based as it is upon dairying and the supply- 
ing of the necessary supplemental plant foods, is such as rapidly 
to increase the fertility of our soil and hence enable us to grow- 
larger crops with greater profit. Our aim is so to conduct our 
cropping as to teach the boys how to produce profitable crops by 
such methods as may be available to them when they possess farms 
of their own. 

The Crops: Hay is one of our principal crops. About 225 
tons have been harvested of which less than half will be sold and 
the remainder will be fed to the live stock on the farms. About 
250 tons of silage are stored for the use of the dairy cattle. We 
expect to harvest about 1800 bushels of field corn all of which 
will be used in feeding the cattle, horses and mules. In addition 
to the grain this should give us about 70 tons of stover for use 
of feed and bedding for the stock. About 25,000 ears of sweet 
com were produced and the accompanying stover will be used as 
feed for our cows. 

The potato crop this year promises to be better than for several 
years past, but as it is not yet harvested we can only say that we 
hope for a crop of 700 or 800 bushels, or enough to supply the 
Boarding Department as long as the potatoes can be kept in good 
condition. This year we are again growing tomatoes for seed for 
Messrs. W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Seedsmen. Only a portion of 
the crop has been picked, but we look for a yield of not less than 
3,500 bushels. 

Last year we harvested a total of about 1,500 bushels of 
apples. This season the crop will be less than one-fourth of that 



34 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

due to the severe cold of last winter and also that this happens to 
be an off year in this part of the country, but the quality of the 
apples harvested this year is far better than any preceding crop. 
There will be a few apples for marketing and enough others to give 
the Boarding Departmnt all it can use while they can be kept in 
storage. 

The Dairy: The dairy herds have produced 133,218 quarts 
of milk or an average of 364 quarts daily throughoout the year. 
The value of this milk is approximately $6,000.00. This has been 
disposed of in the usual ways. Both the Jewish and the Mount 
Sinai Hospitals have been supplied and our own Boarding Depart- 
ment furnished with milk and cream, besides butter for a few 
months in the winter. 

Since this locality is well-suited to dairying, that interest con- 
tinues to be the leading one on our farms, and must so continue 
as long as we undertake to fit young men to own farms of their 
own. Throughout most of our northern and eastern states dairying 
offers the best opportunities for the young man who starts out 
on a farm of his own, since, from the beginning, he is assured of 
a regular income from the sale of dairy products. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. H. BISHOP, 

Agriculturist. 



SUNDRY DONATIONS 

Needle Work Guild of America, Philadelphia Section 

260 Pieces of New Clothing 

Nixon, Martin & W. H., Philadelphia Paper for this Book 

Oppenheimer, Mrs. Max, Philadelphia 

Ice Cream and Cake Treat for Household 

Parke, Davis & Co., Philadelphia Medicinal Supplies 

Price, Thos. W., & Co., Philadelphia Paper for Cover of this Book 

Rosenthal, Mr. Henry, Philadelphia Gasoline Engine 

Samuel, Dr. J. Bunf ord, Philadelphia 

Subscription to "Popular Electricity" 

Schoneman, Mrs. Rosa, Philadelphia . . Large Quantity of Sewing Supplies 

Shoemaker & Busch, Philadelphia Medicinal Supplies 

Spitz, Mr. Samuel, Philadelphia Pail of Mince Meat 

Western Fruit Grower, St. Joseph, Mo Free Subscription 

Wolf Brothers, Philadelphia Large Quantity of Envelopes 

Wyeth, Messrs. John, & Bros., Phila Medicinal Supplies 



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THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 35 



Horticultural Department Report 



Since our last report the Horticultural Department has contin- 
ued to show substantial progress. ]\Iany new varieties have been 
added to our collection of plants in our greenhouses, largely through 
friendly donations. A new feature this year is the planting of 
one-half of the Rose Krauskopf Memorial Greenhouse, with chrys- 
anthemums, which promises good results. 

A larger number of plants were propagated than ever before, 
of which many hundreds were used in the decoration of our 
grounds. Fifteen hundred young evergreens were also propagated 
and have been planted in the Nursery, adding much to its value; ^ 
these plants are somewhat difficult to reproduce and the students in 
charge of this branch of the department deserve great credit. The 
stock withstood the rigors of last winter without injury. It contains 
many beautiful specimens and has made splendid growth this 
season. 

A Japanese creeping vine has been planted at the base of the 
Elise Binswanger Memorial Arch and, it is hoped, by next sum- 
mer, will have spread over part of the arch. A pergola has been 
erected at the end of the new extension of the Nursery. 

In no previous year has this department supplied a more abund- 
ant amount of vegetables to the Boarding House, while quantities of 
tomatoes, beans and other vegetables have been canned for winter 
use. 

In my last report I spoke of the pressing need of a fitting cellar 
for the storage of fruits and vegetables for winter use. I am still 
in hopes that some generous friend of the School will supply this 
want. 

The students' individual gardens have been maintained at a 
high standard this season. Dr. and Mrs. Krauskopf again placed 
at my disposal $25.00 for prizes to be awarded in this contest. 

The cash sales of products sold from this department were. 
$202.21 from the Nursery, $590.75 from Greenhouse products and 
$39.43 from the vegetable gardens, making a total of $832.39. 
Vegetables were supplied to the Boarding House to the amount of 
$726 . 00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. F. FANCOURT. 



36 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Report of the Ladies' Auxiliary Board 

The Directresses of the Board of the Ladies' Auxihary of the 
National Farm School during the past year, held monthly meetings 
in the Board Room of Temple Keneseth Israel from October until 
May (inclusive). 

Their aim is to co-operate with the Executive Board. Their 
committees consult with the Matron of the Farm School in refer- 
ence to provisions and domestic help needed and members of the 
Board visit the Farm School semi-monthlv. 



NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL SEWING CIRCLE 



Meetings of the Farm School Sewing Circle were held in 
1911-1912 on the first and third Thursday of each month from 
November to April finclusive). There has been a falling off in 
the attendance, consequently the work done was not as satisfactory 
as heretofore. It is to be hoped that more interest in the good 
work will be shown the coming season and a hearty welcome is 
promised to all who will attend the meetings. 

The following articles were made and sent to the Farm School : 
53 sheets, 34 waiter's aprons, 26 laundry bags, 132 table nap- 
kins, 154 face towels, 18 roller towels. 

MRS. ROSA B. SCHOXEMAN, 

Chairman. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

EMERGENCY FUND 

November 27th, Balance on Hand $62.62 

March 12th, Voucher No. 6020, Appropriation for January 

to June ,' 70.00 

$132.62 

$131-23 



$1-39 



LADIES' AUXILIARY FUND 

November 27th, Balance on hand $71.70 

December 26th, Mrs. Schoneman, for 1911 Christmas gifts.. 9.75 
September ist, Balance on hand $61. 9S 

MRS. J. GUCKENHEIMER, 

Treasurer. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 37 



Matron's Report 



One hundred and three students have passed through the School 
iuring the year. We have sleeping accommodations in four buildings. 
Owing to lack of funds, the dining hall has not been improved by the 
suggested enlargement, thus the crovs^eded seating capacity is a drawback 
to discipline and decorum. 

With the purchase of a fine refrigerator, holding 800 pounds of ice, 
the building of a sanitary receptacle for garbage and an air shaft in 
the kitchen ceiling, the culinary department has been very much 
benefitted. 

The number of help in the household remains the same as last year. 
Ice has been supplied from our own lake for all the needs of the 
institution. The kitchen garden supplied the household with an abund- 
ant quantity of every kind of vegetable, some fruit and apples. The 
dairy has supplied us with cream, milk and butter. There have been 
preserved for winter use, about fifteen hundred quarts of string beans, 
tomatoes, crab apples, pears, cherries, grapss and jellies. 

Following is a list of the products of the farm supplied to the 
Boarding Department, from October 1st, 1911, to August 31st, 1912, a 
peiriod of eleven months: 

Milk, 21,786 quarts $9i7-S8 

Butter, 750 pounds 216.70 

Cream, 551 quarts IS4-45 

« Cheese, 44 pounds i . 55 

Eggs, 231 dozen 63 .85 

Poultry, 402 pounds 72 . 32 

Celery, 331 heads 13-24 

Onions, 19 bushels 16.20 

Squashes, 160 4.80 

Tomatoes (Greenhouse), 245 pounds 16.50 

Cumumbers (Greenhouse), 3200 i7-SO 

Potatoes, 129 bushels 129.00 

Parslej-, 137 bunches , 8.90 

Cider, 90 gallons 5 • 04 

Suer Kraut, i bbl 7-50 

Rhubarb, 345 bunches ' 27.25 

Peas, 5 bushels •. . 6.00 

Kohl Rabi, half-bushel 60 

Beets, ^^ bushels 47-40 

Cabbage, 2245 heads 71-55 

Carrots, 69 bushels 27 .65 

Lima Beans, 20 bushels 24.00 

String Beans, 27 bushels 22.80 

Corn, 11,700 ears 117.00 

Egg Plants, 170 5-10 

Peppers, 2 bushels i - 50 

Tomatoes, 39 bushels 16:30 

Lettuce (Greenhouse), 490 heads 32.60 



38 THE NATIOxNAL FARM SCHOOL 



Turnips, 34 bushels 13 .60 

Apples, 215 bushels 70 . 75 

Apple Butter, 49 gallons 22 . 14 

Vinegar, 90 gallons 12.60 

Asparagus, 455 bunches 55 .80 

Onions, 90 bunches 4-50 

Radishes, 900 bunches | 33 .60 

Carrots, 15 bunches .75 

The Ladies' Auxiliary Sewing Circle of The National Farm School 
furnishes the store room with all kinds of linens and useful articles. 
The Needle Work Guild of Philadelphia, makes an annual donation of 
serviceable garments. A number of large drug firms have kindly sup- 
plied us with home remedies. We are again grateful to the Jewish 
Hospital for kind treatment of our students who required special care in 
several cases, surgical operations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HETTY ABRAHAM, Matron. 



The Alumni Association 



The Alumni Association celebrated its second year's existence 
at its Third Annual Meeting, held on October 6th, 1912, at Segal 
Hall, Farm School. 

Fifteen Alumni were present. Numerous letters and telegrams 
were received from graduates, who could not attend, assuring their 
loyal support to the Association and their Alma Mater. 

The Secretary, Charles Horn, '06, reported that a great many 
of the graduates are holding excellent agricultural positions. A 
number of them are purchasing farms of their own within the 
vicinity of the School. 

Encouraging reports were received from the four Alumni in 
charge of the Colony at Clarion, Utah. 

At the meeting held on October 6th, 1912, it was agreed to 
offer to the student who has been most efficient in practical and 
theoretical general agriculture, a gold medal, provided he has 
completed the full prescribed course of study and work. Judgment 
to be passed by Faculty. 

Officers were elected for the ensuing year, as follows : 

President — Jacob Ratner, '05. 

Vice President — Samuel Galblum, '08. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Charles Horn, '06. 

Executive Committee — Max Coltun, '10, and Emanuel Malis, 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 39 



What some of the Graduates of the National 
Farm School are doing. 



Aarons, Harry, Downsman, Wis.— Cultivating his own farm ("Sunnybrook 
Farm"). 

Anderson, Victor, Sanatoga, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Atkatz, Joseph, care of F. T. Stryker, Highlands, N. J.— Farm manager. 

Berg, Henry, East Mansfield, Mass. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Blackman, Morris, Philadelphia. — Chemicals. 

Borovick, George, Chicago, 111. — Pharmacist. 

Brown, Benj., Covington, Ky. — General farming. 

Burd, Louis, Philadelphia. — In business. 

Chodesh, Benj., Gap, Pa. — Doctor of veterinary. 

Coltun, Max J., New Brunswick, N. J. — Milk inspector. 

Druckerman, Benjamin, Clarion, Utah. — Cultivating his own farm and 
instructing the pioneers of the Clarion, Utah, Jewish Colony. 

Einstein, Sylvan D., Norma, N. J. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Epstein, Abraham, R. F. D. No. 3, Stamford, Conn. — Dairying on rented 
farm. 

Erde, Herman W., E. Lansing, Mich.— Attending Michigan State Agricult- 
ural College. 

Feldman, N., Philadelphia — Specializing in veterinary science at University 
of Pennsylvania. 

Fleisher, Max, Vineland, N. J. — Superintendent of dairy, N. J. Training 
School. 

Frank, Harry, Jr., care of S. Ettinger, Tinley Park, 111. — Farm manager. 

Friedman, David A., Clarion, Utah. — Cultivating his own farm and instruct- 
ing the pioneers of the Clarion, Utah, Jewish Farm Colony. 

Friedman, S., New York City. — In business. 

Galblum, S., Norristown, Pa.— Cultivating his own farm (Skippack Farm). 

Glantz, Emanuel, Fleishman's Station, N. Y.— Cultivating his own farm. 

Goldberg, Benj., care of R. F.Shannon, Sewickly, Pa.— General agriculture. 

Goldman, Meyer, Norma, N. J.— Instructor in elementary agriculture to 
children of Jewish Colony. 

Green, Meyer, Elizabeth, N. J. — Civil Engineer. 

Halbert, M., care of J. W. Wynkoop, Erie, Pa. — General agriculture. 

Hausmann, Samuel, New York City.— With a fertilizer company. 

Heller, Chas. J., Manchester, Mass.— In charge of Department of Market 
Gardening, Massachusetts State Agricultural College. 

Hirsch, Harry S., Lyons, 111. — On his own poultry farm. 

Hirsch, Louis, Pittsburgh, Pa. — In business. 

Horn, Charles, Philadelphia. — Ass't Superintendent, Philadelphia Vacant 
Lots Cultivation Association. 

Horn, Irving, Philadelphia. — In business. 

Ibaugh, George W., White Haven, Pa. — Farm manager, White Haven Sani- 
tarium. 



40 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Kahan, Jacob, Rushland, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Krinzman, Philip, Elizabeth, N. J. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Kysela, Rudolph, Denver, Colo. — In business. 

Landsman, Harry, Yonkers, N. Y. — On dairy farm. 

Lauchman, Wm., Carey St. Road, Richmond, Va. — Farm manager. 

Lebeson, Harry, Sylvania, Ohio. — General agriculture. 

Lebeson, Herman, Columbus, Ohio. — Attending Ohio State College. 

Leff, Isador, Novelty, Ohio. — Cultivating his own farm (Ivermoot Farm). 

Leib, Louis, Washington, D. C. — Manager of dairy company. 

Leiser, Monroe, Eagle Lake, Fla. — Cultivating his own farm (with 
Jerome Levy). 

Lenik, Benjamin, R. F. D. 49, Leland, 111. — General agriculture. 

Leon, Marcus, Des Moines, la. — In business. 

Levy, Jerome, Eagle Lake, Fla. — Cultivating his own fruit farm (with M. 
Leiser). 

Levin, Julius N. Situate Road. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Lipschutz, Nathan, Williamson School, Pa. — Asst. Herdsman, Williamson 
Trade School. 

Lubin, Harry, Norma, N. J. — Asst. instructor in gardening. 

Major, Edward, Vineland, N. J. — Superintendent of Orchards, N. J. Train- 
ing School. 

Malish, M., Philadelphia. — Dairy business. 

Margoliuth, Aaron, Minneapolis, Minn. — General agriculture. 

Michaelson, M., Indianapolis, Ind. — Manager National Tree Surgery Co. 

Miller, A., Chicago, Illinois. — Seeds and floriculture business. 

Miller, Joseph, Clarion, Utah. — Cultivating his own farm and directing in 
the Settlement of Clarion, Utah, Jewish Colony. 

Minkowsky, J., Belmont Farm, Perryville, Ohio. — Dairyman. 

Mitzmain, Maurice, B.A., M.Sc, Philippine Islands. — Entomologist Veter- 
inary Corps, Philippine Is. Dept. of Agriculture. 

Monblatt, Alex., Chicago, 111. — In business. 

Morris, Max, New Orleans, La. — Treasurer of land company. 

Moskovitz, Morris, care of C. H. Thomas, Herkimer, N. Y. — General 
agriculture. 

Naum, Harry, Liberty, N. Y. — Farm manager. Working Men's Circle Sani- 
tarium. 

Norvick, Jacob, Philadelphia. — In business. 

Ostrolenk, Bernard, Slayton, Minn. — Director Agricultural Dept., Slayton 
Public Schools. 

Ostrolenk, Lewis, Gloversville, N. Y. — Dairying. 

Packer, Benjamin, Beasley Point, N. J. — Gardener. 

Peyser, Sol, New York City. — Attorne}^ 

Ratner, Henry, Norristown, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm (Valley Brook 
Farm) with brother. 

Ratner, Jacob, Norristown, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm (Valley Brook 
Farm) with brother. 

Ratner, Joseph, Detroit, Mich. — Farm manager. 

Rich, Harry, Weatogue, Conn. — General Mgr., Tobacco Plantations of Am- 
erican Sumatra Tobacco Co. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 41 



Rock, Louis, Philadelphia. — In business. 

Rocklin, S. S., care of H. H. Pearson, Jr., Claiborne, Md. — Stock raising. 

Rose, Leonard, Milwaukee, Wis. — Studying chemistry. 

Rosenberg, N., Rome, N. Y. — General agriculture. 

Rosenfelt, Maurice, Philadelphia. — Florist. 

Rudley, Samuel, Philadelphia. — Dairying. 

Salinger, Morris, Clarion, Utah. — Cultivating his own farm and instructing 
the pioneers of the Clarion, Utah, Jewish Farm Colony. 

Sarner, Jos. L., Doylestown, Pa. — Cultivating own farm. 

Schlesinger, Alphonse, New Orleans, La. — In business. 

Schulman, Harry, St. Louis, Mo. — Asst. Manager, Traffic Dept. Missouri- 
Pacific Ry. Co. 

Serber, D., Land Title Building, Philadelphia. — Attorney. 

Serlin, Wm. J., Detroit, Mich. — In business. 

Silver, Chas., Monroeville, N. J. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Sobel, Sol., Ridgewood, N. J. — Farm manager. 

Sparberg, Geo. L., Oshkosh, Wis. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Speyer, Aaron, R. F. D. No. 3, Painesville, Ohio. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Stabinsky, Julius, Atlanta, Ga. — Dairying. 

Taubenhaus, Jacob, Newark, Del. — Assistant Chief in Dept. Plant Pathology, 
Delaware Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Weinberg, Harry, Palestine, Texas. — In charge of tobacco plantations of 
Wm. Taussig Tobacco Co. 

Wiseman, J. H., Pittsburgh, Pa.— Instructor in Gardening, Board of Public 
Education. 

Wolf, E. H., Philadelphia. — In business. 

Zalinger, Bernie A., Chicago, 111.— Florist. 




42 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

SENIOR CLASS 

BRODIE, SAMUEL Manchester, N. H. 

FERESHETIAN, MARTIN Philadelphia, Pa. 

HARRISON, BERYL Des Moines, la. 

MARCUS, JESSE Chicago, 111. 

POPOLOW, PHILIP Philadelphia, Pa. 

PLOTKIN, MICHAEL Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WEISS, HARRY Philadelphia, Pa. 

WITKIN, ABRAHAM Philadelphia, Pa. 

WORK, JAMES Philadelphia, Pa. 

JUNIOR CLASS 

AMRUM, PHILIP Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BACHMAN, ARTHUR Philadelphia, Pa. 

BERMAN, MAURICE Philadelphia, Pa. 

DESSELL, HERMAN Cleveland, Okla, 

DINTER, SOLOMON Philadelphia, Pa. 

EDLEMAN, JULIUS Boston, Mass. 

HARVEY, HARRY Pensauken, N. J. 

HOW, WALTER Philadelphia, Pa. 

KARMIOHL, WILLIAM New York City, N. Y. 

LEVINSON, JULIUS Chicago, 111. 

LEIBOWITZ, SAMUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

SAMSON, MICHAEL Newark, N. J. 

SCHLESINGER, EDWARD Philadelphia, Pa. 

STOLAROFF, MYER El Paso, Texas 

WEIGHTMAN, BENJ Philadelphia, Pa. 

WISEMAN, PHILIP .• Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WOOLWICH, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

WOOLWICH, AARON Philadelphia, Pa. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

ABRAMS, SAMUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOEHRET, RODNEY Chalfont, Pa. 

CAPEK, THADDEUS New York City, N. Y. 

CHARON, OSCAR Philadelphia, Pa. 

CROHN, LAWRENCE New York City, N. Y. 

FINKEL, JACOB Philadelphia, Pa. 

FRIED, ALBERT Vermilion, O. 

FRIEDMAN, AARON Philadelphia, Pa. 

GLASER, MEYER Philadelphia, Pa. 

GINSBERG, LEO Pittstown, N. J. 

GOTTLIEB, JOS New York City, N. Y. 

GORDON, ABE Rochester, N. Y. 

HECKER, GEORGE Philadelphia, Pa. 

HELFAND, LOUIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

JAFFE, DAVID Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 43 



KAHN, KARL Little Rock, Ark. 

KERNER, SAMUEL Pittsburgh, Pa. 

KRAVET, LEWIS New York City, N. Y. 

LEVY, HENRY New York City, N. Y. 

MARCUS, SAMUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

McCRACKEN, WILLIAM J Philadelphia, Pa. 

RASKIN, JACOB New York City, N. Y. 

REDALIA, LEWIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

RICHKE, ISRAEL New York City, N. Y. 

ROSENBERG, SAMUEL M Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROSENTHAL, JOSEPH New York City, N. Y. 

SCHULTZ, RUDOLPH Newark, N. J. 

SCHMOOKLER, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa, 

SOBEL, ISIDORE New York City, N. Y. 

WEIGLE, FRED Philadelphia, Pa. 

WOLF, HYMAN New York, N. Y. 

YUCKMAN, PHILIP Philadelphia, Pa. 

ZIMMERMAN, EDWARD New York City, N. Y. 

ZWEIGHAFT, BERNARD Alliance, N. J. 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

BAUTMAN, ISRAEL Newburgh, N. Y. 

BILIK, JACOB Franklin Park, N. J. 

BLUME, HENRY ' El Paso, Tex. 

BURTON, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

BURCHUK, ALEX Philadelphia, Pa. 

BRODSKY, SAMUEL New York, N. Y. 

DAVIDSON, SAMUEL Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

ELKON, SAMUEL Rochester, N. Y. 

GEORGE, HOWARD Philadelphia, Pa. 

GOLDMAN, BERNARD Philadelphia, Pa. 

GREENBURG, A Philadelphia, Pa. 

HORNSTEIN, MOSES Boston, Mass. 

JENKINS, ALBERT Philadelphia, Pa. 

JOHNSTON, EDWIN Lansdowne, Pa. 

KASKIN, LOUIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

KLEIN, ELMER Cleveland, Ohio 

LASKER, SAMUEL Providence, R. I. 

LECHNER, SAMUEL New York, N. Y. 

LIGHT, PHILIP Newark, N. J. 

MILLER, PHILIP Philadelphia, Pa. 

NUSSBAUM, CHARLES Philadelphia, Pa. 

RIEUR, JACOB New York, N. Y. 

ROSS, HENRY Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SANDLER, JACOB Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCHUTZBANK, JACOB Freehold, N. J. 

SEMEL, MAX New York, N. Y. 

SELIGMAN, MARTIN • Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SHOR. HARRY New York, N. Y. 

SIDON, EDWARD New York, N. Y. 

SORKIN. LEWIS Bayonne, N. J. 

ULMAN, JULIUS Savannah. Ga. 



Prizes to Students 



The appeal made to friends of the school to contribute 
money prizes for efficiency in the various departments of 
the School, was answered, to so pleasing an extent, that, 
during the past year, $284.50, in cash, were awarded to the 
various students at the School for proficiency, efifort and 
improvement. The money for these prizes is contributed 
as follows : 

"The Herbert T. Hyman Prizes." The interest of 
$150.00 donated by Mrs. Bernard Sluizer, in memory of 
her son. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of 
$250.00 contributed to the Endowment Fund by Harry 
Louchheim, of New York, in. memory of his father. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of 
$250.00 contributed to the Endowment Fund by Mrs. L. 
S. Eliel, of Philadelphia, in memory of her father. 

"The Anchel Rosenthal Prizes." The interest of 
$500.00 bequeathed to the Endowment Fund. 

"The Harriet B. Labe Prizes." The interest of $100.00 

bequeathed to the Endov/ment Fund. 

Mr. Sa^mel Grabfelder. Philadelphia fqnnual) $2ri.OO 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf, Philadelphia (annual) . . 25.00 
Mr. Louis Lopb. New Yo"k :v mf^i^or" of ' i= v/'fe (annual) 2.o.oo 

Mr. .Tosenh Potsdamer. Philadelphia (annual) 25.00 

Mr. Ralph Blum, Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Mrs. Gabriel Blum, Philadelphia, in memory of her sister 

(annual) 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Hart Blumenthal, Philadelphia, in memory 

of their son Ralph (annual) 10.00 

Mrs. Sol Blumenthal, Philadelphia, in memory of her hus- 
band (annua') 10.00 

Mr. David Kirschbaum, Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Mr. Moe Lieberman, Phlladel' ha (annual) 10.00 

Mr. I. L. Marks, Chicago (annual) 10.00 

Mr. I. H. Silverman, Phil^del'^^" (annual) 10.00 

Mr. Max Berg, Philadelphia (annual) 5.00 

Mrs. D. BBerlizheimer, Philadelphia (annual) 5.00 

Harding & Fancoult, Philadelphia 5.00 

Mr. Samuel D. Lit, Philadel'ha (annual) 5.ou 

Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 5.00 

A. Miller, Chicago 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Oppenheimer, Philadelphia 666 66 5.00 

Mrs. Henry Rosenthal, Philadelphia (annual) 5.00 

Mrs. Jacob Weil, Philadelphia in memory of Hulda 

Oppenheimer (annual) 5.00 

Mr. George C. "Watson, Philadelphia (annual) 2.00 



□ 



Buildings Donated 



I. Theresa Loeb Memorial Green House, 

In memory of Theresa Loeb, Ogontz, Pa., by her family. 
Erected 1898. 

II. Ida M. Block Memorial Chapel, 

In memory of Ida M. Bloch, Kansas City, Mo., by her 
husband and family. Erected 1899. 

III. Zadok M. Eisner Memorial Laboratory, 

In memory of Zadok M. Eisner, Philadelphia, Pa., 
by his wife. Erected 1899. 

IV. Rose Krauskopf Memorial Green House, 

In memory of Rose Krauskopf, Philadelphia, Pa., by 
her children. Erected 1899. 

V. Dairy, by Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Aaron. 

Pittsburg, Pa. Erected 1899. 

VI. Adolph Segal Hall, 

Containing Library, Lecture Hall, Administration Of- 
fices and Dormitories, by Mr. Adolph Segal, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. Erected 1906. 

VII. Frances E. Loeb Vegetable Forcing 
Green House, 

In memory of Frances E. Loeb, by her husband. 
Erected iqo8. 





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Permanent Improvements 

I. Lake Archer Rosenthal 

In memory of Archer Rosenthal, Philadelphia, Pa., 
by his brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Rosenthal, built in 1908. 

II. Elise Binswanger Nursery 

In memory of Elise Binswanger, Kansas City, Mo., 
by her grandson and granddaughter, planted in 1909. 

III. Samuel Strauss, Jr., Division of Nursery- 

Rhododendrons and Roses in memory of Samuel 
Strauss, Jr., Philadelphia, by his wife, 1910. 

IV. Louis L Aaron Ice House 

In honor of his 70th birthday, by Mr. L,ouis I. 
Aaron, of Pittsburgh, Pa. Erected 191 1. 




Hi 

In! 

i 



Scholarships 



1908— "WM. S. RAYNER SCHOLARSHIP." The 
income of $5,000 contributed to the Endowment 
Fund by his daughter, Mrs. Bertha Rayner 
Frank. 

1908— "DR. SAMUEL L. FRANK SCHOLAR- 
SHIP." The income of $5,000 contributed to 
the Endowment Fund by his wife, Mrs. Bertha 
Rayner Frank. 



P 



rizes 



1907— "THE HERBERT T. HYMAN PRIZES." 
The interest of $150 donated by Mrs. Bernard 
Sluizer, in memory of her son. ' 

1908— "THE JOSEPH LOUCHHEIM PRIZES." 
The interest of $250 contributed to the Endow- 
ment Fund by Harry Louchheim, of New York, 
in memory of his father. 

1908— "THE JOSEPH LOUCHHEIM PRIZES." 
The interest of $250 contributed to the Endow- 
ment Fund by Mrs. Louis S. EHel, in memory 
of her father. 

1910— "THE ANCHEL ROSENTHAL PRIZES." 
The interest of $500.00 being the income of a 
bequest. 

1911— "THE HARRIET B. LABE PRIZES." 

The interest of $100.00, being the income of a 
bequest. 



m 



emorial Trees 



Planted in Spring, 1912, in Memary of 



PHILADELPHIA 

Abeles, Simon 
P>amberger, Max 
Blaw, Benjamin 
Block, Jack 
Bornstein, Charles 
Boiitelje, Eleazer 
Boutelje, Rebecca 
Brunswick, Raphael 
Colien, Henrietta Brunswick 
Darmstadter, Sophia 
Engel, Clara Brunswick 
Feldstein. Dr. Adol"h 
Frank, Adelaide Loeb 
Freeman, Louis 
Cans, Theresa K. 
Gin?burg, Mary 
Goldman, Marcus 
Gross, Rose Beckman 
Hamberg, Fannie 
Hamburger, Joseph 
Hamburger, Julia 
Haniebaum, Iraac 
Plerzberg, Abrarn 
Hess, Aaron 
ITvneman, Augusta J. 
Isaacs, Isaac S. 
Kaufman, Clara 
Kaufman, Is^ac 
Largeman, Freda 
Liberman, Samuel 
T ieberman, Johpnna 
Metzger, Jacob L- 
Meyers, Teanette 
Morris, T?achael 
Netter, Theodore 
P^'mental, Nithan 
Pimental, Solomon 
Schneideman, Louisa 
Schneideman, Emelia 
Schwartz, Alfred 
Sessler, i^ouise 
Stein, Dr. Solomon S. 



Stern, Levi 
Sternau, Herman 
Strouse, Henry J, 
Walter, Barbara 
Weyl, Adolph 
Wilson, Florence 
Zineman, Emanuel 

NEW YORK 

Frank, Freda 
Guggenheim, Benjamin 
Hamburg, Lillian 
Harris, Henry B. 
Hyman, Mattie 
Hydeman, Sarah 
Latz, Solomon 
Levy, Jeanette 
Levy, Morris 
Openhym, William 
Straus, If.idor 
Straus, Mrs. Isidor 
Schwab, Pauline 
Stettheimer, George 
Stettheimer, Jacob, Jr. 
Stettheimer, Lina 
Stettheimer, I ouis J. 
Stettheimer, Max J. 
Wolff, Mfred R. 
Wolff, Fried ericke 
Wolff, Rudolph 

PITTSBURGLL PA. 
De Roy, Lydia 
Edel, Freda R. 
I'-r-'el, Adelheide 
Kahn, Fannie Adler 
Oppenheimer, B. 
Raphael, Rudolph 

B \LTIMORE, MD. 
Greensfelder, Rachael 
Greensfelder, Hennye 
Kaufman, Frank 
Levy, Michael S. 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 
Abraham, Abraham 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
Friedman, Joseph N. 
Friedman, Marian Josephir' 
Landsberg, ^iriam 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 

Aaron, Rabbi, Israel, D. D. 

CLEVELAND, OFIIO 

Einstein, Felix H. 

ETHANAC, CAL. 

Jacobs, Edgar Weinstein 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Levy, Isaac 

HAMILTON, OHIO 

Strauss, Meyer 

OSKALOOSA, lA. 

Baldauf, Samuel 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 
Barkhouse, Nancy L. 
Goldsmith, Norton L. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

Klaber, Herman 

MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

Loeb, Jacques 

SELMA, ALA. 

Elkan, Mrs. Elena 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Mandel, Leon 

Phillipson, Joseph 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 
Kaufman, Joseph 



FESTIVE TREES 

Planted in Spring, 1912, in Honor of 



Mr. and Mrs. Sidney S. Cohen, Philadelphia, 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Frank, Philadelphia, wed 
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob S. Goldbaum, Philadelphia, 
Henry Hackenburg Fleisher, Jr., Philadelphia, 
Mildred Rice Hoffman, Philadelphia, birth, July 
Villnrd L. Isaacs, Philadelphia, confirmation, 
Edith Ladenburger, New Rochelle, N. Y., birth, 
Mr. and Mrs. Mack Latz, Atlantic City, N. J., 

June 3, 191 1. 
Mr. and Mrs. Moe Lieberman, Philadelnhia, 
Puth Miller, Pittsburgh, Pa.,, birih. Novemtier 
Mr and Mrs. Leon Oppenheimer, Philadelphia, 
Irene L. Pre=-.s, Philadelphia, hirfh, Alarch _o, 
•T.ennie Scharff and Harry Snndhpim, St. Louis, 
Dr. Justin G. Schwerin, Philadelphia, thirty 
^^T. and Mrs. Sim T. Simon, Philadelphia, wed 
Mr. and Mrs. John" H. Sinb^rg, Ph-'ladelpbia, 
Hazel Yondorf and Morton Mannheimer, Chi 



wedding, June 23, 191 1- 
lins;, 191 1. 
wedding, September 14, 191 1. 
birth, November 26, 1908. 
24, 1909. 
191 1. 

August 21, 1911- 
twenty-sixth wedding anniversary, 

wedding, February 11, 1912- 

I, IQI I. 

wedding, November 4, 191 1. 

IQI 2. 

Mo., betrothal, October 23, 191 1- 
•ccond birthday, August 28, 191 1. 

fing, February 12, 1912. 
wcdd'ug. May 15, 19 12. 
■ago. 111., betrothal, April 7, 1912 



Legacies and Beque^s 

Money received in legacies and bequests is placed in the 

Endowment Fund. 
Estate of — 
1895 — In memoriam Jacob Tuck and wife, by their 

children, Philadelphia $1,000 00 

1899 — Carolyn Parent Nirdlinger, Philadelphia. . . 500 00 

1903 — Jacob H. Hecht. Boston, Mass 500 oc 

1905 — Moses Lichten, Philadelphia 500 00 

1906 — Marx Wineland, Frostberg, Md., 500 00 

1907 — Frances Seligman, Philadelphia, 

(For Bernard and Frances Seligman L il i aiyAlcove. . . 200 DO 

" — Fannie Houseman, Philadelphia, 

(In memory of her son, Arthur Ballenberg Houseman), . 100 OO 

" — Edward Popper, Greenville, Texas, loo oo 

" — Samuel W. Goodman, Philadelphia, 200 00 

" — Fannie Simon, Philadelphia, 50 00 

" — Isaac Sailer, Philadelphia, 500 00 

1908 — Leah Bernheimer, Mobile, Ala., 100 00 

" — Eleanore Samuel, Philadelphia, 343 29 

" — Solomon Blumenthal, Philadelphia, 250 00 

1909 — Moses H. Stern, Philadelphia 500 00. 

" — Esther Sailer, Philadelphia, 78 05 

" — Rebecca Haas, Indianapolis, Ind., 100 00 

" — Blanche Loeb, New York 1,00000 

1910 — Anchel Rosenthal, Philadelphia 500 00 

" — Abraham Lipman, Pittsburgh, Pa 500 00 

— Henrietta Morgenroth, Louisville, Ky 500 00 

" — In Memory of Milton L. Snellenburg, by his 

Father 2,000 00 

191 1 — Samuel Baklauf, Oskaloosa, Iowa 300 00 

— Max Bamberger, Philadelphia 5,000 00 

— Harriet B. Labe, Philadelphia 100.00 

— Adolph Leberman, Philadelphia 100 00 

1 91 2 — Annie M. Ferguson. Pittsburgh, Pa 100 00 

" — Mina Friedman, Chicago, 111 100 00 

" — Benjamin Kahn, Philadelphia 200 00 

— Louis Lowenthal, Rochester, N. Y 500 oa 

" — Levi Stern, Philadelphia 100 00 

" — Abraham Weiler, Columbus, Ohio 200 00 




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LEGACIES AND ENDOWMENTS 

TO THE FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITY OP 
PHILADELPHIA 

1902— MRS. CARRIE HAMBURG, in memory of her 

husband, Isaac Hamberg $ 100 °o 

1902— CHILDREN OF DAVID ETTINGER, in memory 

of their father 100 00 

1903— MRS. ALICE HAGEDORN, in memory of her 

husband, John J. Hagedorn 5,ooo 00 

1903— HERMAN JONAS 7.5oo 00 

1903— MRS. CARRIE HAMBERG (additional) 100 00 

1903— ERNST KAUFMANN .• 2,00000 

1904— MRS. CARRIE HAMBERG (additional) 100 00 

1904— AUGUSTUS MARKS, in memory of his wife, 

Virginia Marks So 00 

1904— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 10 00 

igos— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 100 00 

igos— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) ioo 00 

190s— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 100 00 

190S— SIGMUND ROEDELHEIM 500 00 

190S— MRS. CARRIE KRIEGER, in memory of her 

husband, Samuel Krieger 1,000 00 

igos — WM. KRIEGER, in memory of his father, 

Samuel Krieger 100 00 

1905— HERMAN B. BLUMENTHAL 2,000 00 

1905— S. M. and M. S. FRIDENBERG, in memory 

of Esther, wife of S. M. Fridenberg 1,000 00 

1906— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 100 00 

1906— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 40 00 

1908— MRS. FANNIE A. LEBERMAN 500 00 

1908— ISSAC HERZBERG 3.000 00 

1909— CHILDREN OF THE LATE SIMON AND 
ROSA FLEISHER, creating the Simon and Rosa 

Fleisher Endowment S.ooo 00 

igog — D. Frank Greenewald, in memory of his mother, 

Sallie Gimbel Greenewald 2,000 00 

igog — Adolph Weyl, in memory of his wife. Rose Weyl. 50 00 

1909 — Estate of Herman Loeb 3.000 00 

igog — Estate of Henry Rothschild i.Soo 00 

1910 — The Milton L. Snellenburg Fund 2,000 00 

(Endowed by his father, Nathan Snellenburg.) 

191 1 — -Estate of Simon Bacharach 200 00 

igii — Adolph Weyl, in Memory of his Wife (additional) 25 00 
191 1 — Mrs. Florence Liveright, in memory of her son, 

Benjamin Kahn Liveright 500 00 

igi I — Estate of Albert M. Nusbaum 1,000 00 

191 1 — Esther Bacharach 200 00 

igii — Adolph Weyl, in Memory of his wife (additional) 25 00 

191 1 — Estate of Abram Herzberg 500 00 

1 9 1 1 — Estate of Leon Gans S,ooo 00 

191 1 — Estate of Charlotte Harburger zoo 00 

1911 — Estate of Meyer Frank 200 00 

19 1 2 — Adolph Weyl, in memory of his grandchild, Ruth 

Weyl 25 00 

Joseph Rosskam Bequest 1,000 00 

Adolph Weyl Bequest 100 00 

Martin Frank, in memory of his parents, Leon 

and Mathilde Frank 500 00 

Children of the late Simon and Esther Bacharach 1,500 00 



52 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



LIFE MEMBERS 



One payment of $100.00, one time, into the Endowment Fund 



ALABAMA 
Mobile. 
Bernheimer, Mrs. L. 

CALIFORNIA 

Bakersfield. 

Cohn, C. 

San Francisco. 

Gunst. M. A. 
He'lman, Isaias W. 
Meyer, Mary Jean- 

nette 
Nens nr'ter, IMrs. J. H. 
Rosenbaum, Mrs. C. 

W. 

ENGLAND 
London. 
Meyer, Arthur 

ILLINOIS 

Champaign. 

Kuhn, Caroline L. 
Kuhn, Florence L. 

Chicago. 

Banman, Mrs. Edw. 
Greenebaum, Moses 

E. 
IManr'el. Mrs. Emanuel 
*Mandel, Leon 
pp'rler. Chas. 
Stettauer, Mrs. D. 
Rochelle 
Hilb, Emanuel 

INDIANA 
Ligonier. 

Straus, Ike 

*Deceased 



Straus, Jacob 
IOWA 
V/averly 

A. Slimmer 
Sioux City 

Wise, Mrs. Chas. 

LOUISIANA 
New Orleans. 

District Grand Lodge, 
No. 7, I. O. B. B. 
*Newman, Isidore 
Newman, Mrs. Henry 

MARYLAND 
Baltimore. 

*Rayner, Wm. S. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston. 

Hecht, Mrs. Llna 
Ravitser, Fred 
Shuman, A. 

MISSISSIPPI 

Natchez. 
Frank, H. 

MISSOURI 

St. Joseph. 

Westheiraer. Mr. 

& Mrs. Ferdinand 

Westheimer, Samuel 

St. Louis. 

*Rice, Jonathan 
Stix, C. A. 

NEW YORK 
Buffalo 

Winkler, Mrs. R. S. 



New York. 

*jAbr?)ham, A. 

Blumentbal, Geo. 

Budge, Henry 

Goodhart. PMlip J. 

Guggenheimer, Wm. 

Hay-, Daniel P. 

Heinsheimer, Alfred 
M. 

Hermann, Ferdinand 

Fanf^aTin. B. 

Krauskopf, Mary G. 

Lewisohn, Adolph 
*Mack, Jacob W. 

Marshall. Louis 

Meyer, Wm. 

Salomon, Wm. 

Silberberg, G. 

Sidenberg, G. 

Warburg, Felix M. 

Warburg, Paul M. 

Niagara Falls. 

Silverberg, Bertha 

Rochester. 

Lowenthal,, M. 
Silberberg, M. 
Sillierberg, G. 
Silberberg, G. 

OHIO 

Cincinnati. 

Block, Samuel 
Klfin. Samnpl 
Lowman, Leo. J. 
Meis, Henry 
Reiter, A. 
Sturm, Simon 

Columbus. 

B'nai Israel Sister- 
hood 
Lazarus, Fred'k 
Lazarus, Ralph 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



53 



Miller, Leopld 
Zion Lodge No. 62, 
L O. B. B. 

Youngstown. 

Theobald, Mrs. C. 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Allegheny. 

Rauh, Mrs. Rosalie 
Aftoona. 

Henry, S. Kline 
Langhorne. 

Branson, I. L. 

Philadelphia. 

Betz & Son 

Bloch, B. B. 

Blum, Ralph 
•Blumenthal, Herman 
♦Blumenthal, Sol. 

Byers, Jos. J. 

Clothier, Isaac H. 

Fedei-ation Jewish 
Charities 

Fleisher, Martha S. 

Grant, Adolph 

Harrison, C. C. 

Hagedorn, Mrs. Alice 
•Jonas, Herman 

Kaas, Andrew 

Kaufmann. Morris A. 

Kayser, Samuel 

Krauskopf, Harold 

Langfeld, A. M. 



Levy, Sol. 

Lit, S. D. 
Morris, Chas. E.. 
♦Merz, Daniel 

Merz, Mrs. Regina 
Manko, L. H. 

Morris, Effingham B. 

Muhr, Jacob 
♦Pepper, Dr. Wm. 
♦Pfaelzer, Simon 
Raab, j\Irs. Julia 
Reform Congregation 

Keneseth Israel 
♦Rorke, Allen B. 

Rosenberg, Grace 

Rosenberg, Walter J. 

Rosenberg, Walter I. 

Schloss, Mrs- Herman 

Schoch, Henry R. 

Sternberger, Samuel 

Silberman, Mrs. Ida 

Silverman, I- H. 
♦Snellenberg J. J. 

Snellenberg, Nathan 

Snellenberg, Samuel 

Swaab, M. M., Jr. 
♦Teller, Benj. F. 

Teller, Mrs. B. F. 
♦Teller, Joseph R. 

Trautman, Dr. B. 

Wanamaker, John 
♦Weiler, Herman 

Wolf, I., Jr. 
♦Zweighaft, Simon 
Pittsburg. 

Browarsky, Max 

Cohen, Aaron 

Cohen, Josiah 

Dreifus, C. 
♦Frank. Samuel, by his 
son Ed. K. Frank 



Guckenheimer, Isaac 
Hamburger, Philip 
Hanauer, A. M. 
Kaufman Bros. 
Marcus, Aaron 
SWITZERLAND 
Rorschach. 
*Schoenfeld, Max 
TEXAS 

Dallas- 
Sanger, Alexander 
Sanger, Mrs. Philip 
Silberstein, A. 
Fort Worth 

Levy, Sam 
Galveston 
Lasker, M. 

VIRGINIA 
Norfolk. 
Ladies' Hebrew Be- 
nevolent Asso. 
Richmond. 
Millhiser, Gustave 
Millhiser, Mrs. Clar- 
ence 
WASHINGTON 

Seattle. 

Galland, Bonham 
Galland. Mrs. C. K. 
Gottstein, Meyer 
Gottstein, Rebecca 
Lang, JuMus C. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Wheeling. 

Horkheimer, Mrs. B. 
Solomon & Rubin 
Weil, A. Leo 
Weil, J. 



Contributions by Federations of Charities 



r,500.00 Memphis 200.00 

100.00 



Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 500.00 Milwaukee 

Kansas City 350.00 St. Paul 100.00 

Indianapolis 200.00 Toledo ^^^-^^ 

Little Rock 200.00 Nashville '^^■^^ 

Vicksburg 25.00 



54 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Li^ of Members and Contributors 



FoT the Year ending September 30, 1912. 



ALABAMA 
Alexander City 

Herzfeld. R $5-00 

Birmingham 

Adler, Morris . . . lo.oo 
Congregation 

Emanuel 5.00 

Ermann, Carrie 

and Gustav .... 5.00 

Lesser, Emil 5-oo 

Epes 

Morris, George.... 5-oo 
Livingston 

Tannenbaum, B.... S-oo 

Mobile 

*Bernheimer, Mrs. L. 
Council of Jewish 

Women 5-oo 

Curjel, F 5-oo 

Eichold, L 5-00 

Forchheimer, M. .. 25.00 

Hess, Henry 5-oo 

Montgomery 

Frank, Ferdinand. 5.00 

Kahn, M 5-oo 

Kaufman, Samuel. s-oo 

Kahl, Montgomery 10.00 

Loeb, Jacques .... S-oo 

Weil, Mrs. E. h- S-oo 

Selma 

Schuster, Ben. J... S-oo 
Uniontown 

Pake, Iv. J S-oo 

Wetumpka 

Hohenberg, M. & 

Co S-oo 

ARIZONA 
Tucson 

Jacobs, Lionel M. 10.00 
ARKANSAS 
Helena 

Seelig, B 10.00 

Solomon, Louis . . 2.00 

Hot Springs 

Fellheimer, H. ... S-oo 
Lyons, I. A,, .... 1.00 

Little Rock 

Abeles, Chas. T. .. 10.00 

*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



Baumgarten, Mrs. 

Rekka 5.00 

B'nai Israel Con- 
gregation 10.00 

Cohen, Mark M... 10.00 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities 200.00 

Marianna 

Lesser, Morris . . . 5.00 
CALIFORNIA 

Bakersfield 

*Cohn, C. 
Cohn, C 5-00 

Fresno 

Einstein, Louis, & 

Co 10.00 

La Jolla 

Lieber, W. S S-oo 

Lieber, Mrs. W. S. S-oo 

Lockford 

Bruml, Mrs. Hen- 
ry J 5-00 

Los Angeles 

Asher, Arthur .... 10.00 

Beatus, Jacob 10.00 

Behrendt-Levy Co. 10.00 

Bibo, Joseph 5.00 

Brick, A., & Bros.. 25.00 
Brownstein, Dan'l 

J 10.00 

Cohen, Goldwater 

& Co 5-00 

Cohn, Kaspare ... 10. oc 

Edelman, D. W 10.00 

Fleishman, Adolph. 10.00 
Fleishman, Isidore 

G S-oo 

Getzoff, B 25.00 

Goldschmidt, Max.. 10.00 

Goldstein, M. H... S-oo 

Goldberg, Harry S. 10.00 

Groman, Lou 10.00 

Hecht, Rabbi S., 

D. D 2.00 

Hellman, Maurice 

S 10.00 

Hoffman, Hugo . . 5.00 

Isaacs, L 10.00 



Isaacs, Max . . 
Isenstein, Chas. 
Jacoby, Mrs. Rosa 
Kahn, F. G. . 
Kingsbaker, Mrs, 

Clara 

Klein, Henry . 
Kornblum, M. S 
Krystal, N. . 
Levy, Simon, Co 
Lissner, Meyer 
Loeb & Loeb 

Loew, J 

Louis, Henry M 
Meyer, Alex . . 
Meyer, Louis . . 
Morris, Samuel 
Morris, Wolf . 
Mosbacher, Geo. 
Murphy, Mrs. J. L 
Newmark, Harris. 
Newmark, M. A. . 
Newmark, M. H.. 
Newmark, M. R. 
Nordlinger, Louis. 
Norton, Isaac . . . 
Norton, M. M. . . 
Olcovick, Emil . . 
Roos, Jacques . . . 
Salzman, Jacob . . 

Schein, J 

Seligman, Carl . . 

Simonson, L 

Steinlein, Karl . . 

Triest, Karl 

Zinnamon, L 

Oakland 

Jonas, Abraham . 

Sacramento 

Bonnheim, A. 
Cohen, Isidor 
Davis, Herman 
Garfinkle, Leo 
Jaffe, M. S. . 
Lubin, L. J. . . 

Osry, D. 

Simon, Max . . 
Stone, Sam . . . 
Wahrhaftig, M. S 
San Diego 

Blochman, A 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



55 



San Francisco 

Anspacher, Philip. . lo.oo 

Arnstein, Ludwig . lo.oo 

Aronson, A lo.oo 

Bachman, Arthur. . 5.00 
Bachman, Mrs. Si- 
mon S-oo 

Barth, Jacob 25.00 

Bloom, Samuel . . . 5.00 

Boas, Judah 10.00 

Brandenstein, Ed- 
ward 10.00 

Brenner, Gus 10.00 

Cahn, M. A 5.00 

Ehrman, Sidney M. 5.00 

Esberg, A. 1 10.00 

Esberg, Mrs. Ma- 
thilda 5.00 

Friend (Anony- 
mous) 50.00 

Fries, William .... 5.00 

Gellert, Isaac 5.00 

Gerstle, Mrs. Han- 
nah 5.00 

Goldstein, E. t,. ... 10.00 

Greenebaum, Jacob. 10.00 

Gunst, Morgan A.. 10.00 
*Gunst, Moses A. 

Haas Bros 10.00 

Haas, A 25.00 

Hellman, I. W., Jr. 25.00 
•Hellman, I. W., Sr. 
Hirschfelder, Dr. 

J. O S-oo 

Ickelheimer, S 5.00 

Jacobi, J. J 10.00 

Kahn, Ira 25.00 

Katschinski, B. ... 5.00 
Kaufmann, W i 1- 

liam 5.00 

Kline, David 10.00 

Koshland, M. S. . . 25.00 

lyachman, Henry... 10.00 

Lauchheimer, A. H. 5.00 

Levison, J. B 10.00 

Eevy, Emil 10.00 

Levy, Jules 10.00 

Levy, ly. A 10.00 

Lilienthal, Jesse 

W 10.00 

Metzger, Louis ... 10.00 
•Meyer, Mary Jeanette 

Newman, Bros. . . . 25.00 
•Neustadter, Mr. J. H. 

Raiss, Carl 10.00 

•Rosenbaum, Mrs. Chas. W. 
Rosenberg, Bros. & 

Co 25.00 

Sachs, Lippmann... 10.00 

•Life Member 
•'Deceased Life Member 



Sahlein, Mrs. 

Henry 5.00 

Schlesinger, Chas.. 10.00 

Schlessinger, Chas. 50.00 

Schoenberg, Louis. 10.00 
Schwabacher, Louis 

A s.oo 

Schwabacher, Louis 

Mrs 10.00 

Sinsheimer, B 10.00 

Sinsheimer, Henry. 25.00 

Sloss Family 100.00 

Sloss, Mrs. M. S. 5.00 

Solomon, Lucius L. 10.00 

Spiegl, L. M 10.00 

Walter, Clarence R. 10.00 

Walter, John .... 10.00 

Wangenheim, H... 10.00 

Weinstock, Harris. 25.00 
Werner, Miss 

Zelda 2.50 

Wise, Otto Irving. 10.00 

Wise, Wallace A... 10.00 
San Raphael 

Herzog, S. K 5.00 

Lichtenstein, Benj. 

H 10.00 

Stockton 

Arndt, M. & S 10.00 

Brown, Ike 10.00 

Coblentz, M 5.00 

Cohen, A. J 5.00 

Cohn, J 5.00 

Cohn, Nat 5.00 

Conway, M 5.00 

Emden, Wm., . . . 5.00 
Frankenheimer 

Bros 25.00 

Granich, B 10.00 

Idelman, Philip . . . 5.00 

Kalten, M 5.00 

Levy, M. & Bro. ... 10.00 

Manassee, M 10.00 

Stein, I. F 5.00 

Stein, Martin P... 10.00 

Steinhardt, Carl .. .10.00 
Stockton Outfitting 

Co S-oo 

COLORADO 
Colorado Springs 

Cahn, Isaac 5.00 

Denver 

Cohen, Samuel . . . 5.00 

Eisner, Dr. John. 5.00 

Kubitshek, Henry. 10.00 

Mayer, Leopold . . 5.00 

Longmont 

Marcus, Mrs. H. J. 5.00 



CONNECTICUT 

Ansonia 

Morganstein, Rosa. 10.00 
Ettelson, Rabbi 

Henry W 5.00 

Hartford 

Lyon, Bernhard... 5.00 

Lyon, Felix 5.00 

New Haven 

Adler, Max 5.00 

Jacobs, George . . . 5.00 

Ullman, Isaac M.. 5.00 

Stamford 

Stokes, Rose Pastor 5.00 
Waterbury 

Chase, Isidor 5.00 

DELAWARE 
Seaford 

Greenabaum, E. . . S-oo 
Van Leer, Charles 5.00 

Wilmington 

Levy, D. L. 10.00 

Levy, Morris 5.00 

Moses Montefiore 
Beneficial Socie- 
ty 5.00 

DISTRICT OF COLUM- 
BIA 

Washington 

Blumenfeld, Mrs. 

M 5.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Ed- 
ward 10.00 

Cohen, Max 5.00 

Friedlander, H. . . 5.00 

Goldenberg, M. . . 5.00 

Hahn, Wm 5.00 

Hecht, Alex 10.00 

Hillman, Joel .... 5.00 

Kann, Sigmund . . 5.00 

Luchs, Leopold ... 5.00 

Rich, M. M 3.00 

Salamon, B i.oo 

Sondheimer, J. ... 5.00 
Wallerstein, Mrs. 

G 1.00 

Washington H e - 

brew Cong 5.00 

FLORIDA 

Jacksonville 

Hirschberg, Julius. 10.00 



56 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Pensacola 




Elkan, M. J 


5-00 


GEORGIA 




Albany 




Brown, S. B 


10.00 


Atlanta 




Alexander, Sallie S. 


10.00 


Haas, Leopold, Jr.. 


3-00 


Hebrew Benevo- 




lent Cong 


10.00 


Hirshberg, Isaac . 


5-00 


Katz, Max 


10.00 


Mayer, Albert E.. 


10.00 


Traunstine, Lewis 




T 


5.00 
5.00 


Wilensky, Max H.. 


Dublin 




Weichselbaum Co., 




Samuel 


S-oo 


Eastman 




Herrman, Mrs. J. 




D 


S-oo 


Sandersville 


Cohen, Louis .... 


5.00 


Savannah 




Falk, David B. . . . 


10.00 


Levy, B. H 


5.00 


Myers, Lee Roy... 


35.00 


Solomon, A. W. . . 


5.00 


Solomon, J. A. . . 


5.00 


West Point 




Hagedorn, P 


5.00 


Hagedorn Z 


5.00 


IDAHO 




Boise City 




L a d i e s' Judith 




Montefiore So- 




ciety 


S-oo 



ILLINOIS 

Champaign 

Kaufman, J. M. . . 5.00 
*Kuhn, Caroline L- 
*Kuhn, Florence L. 

Chicago 

Adler, Mrs. D. K. 5.00 

Alschuler, Alfred S. 25.00 

Alscliuler, Samuel. 5.00 
•Bauman, Mrs. Edw. 

Becker Bros. & Co. 10.00 

Bunner, Nathan . 25.00 

•Deceased 

••Deceased Life Alember 



Binswanger, A. ... 5.00 

Binswanger, Jacob. 10.00 

Block, E. J 10.00 

Born. M, & Co... 10.00 

Davis, James 5.00 

Eisenstaedt, Isi- 
dore 10.00 

Foreman, Oscar 

G 5-00 

Frank, Henry L--- 10.00 

Friend i.oo 

Friend, A. S 10.00 

Gatzer, August 5.00 

Gimbel, Charles A. 10.00 

Greenebaum, Elias. 10.00 
Greenebaum, Henry 

N 5.00 

•Greenebaum, Moses E. 

Haas, Chas 25.00 

Harris, Mrs. S. H. 5.00 

Hart, Mrs. H 10.00 

Heyman, Emanuel 

S 10.00 

Horner, Jos 10.00 

Cora, B 5.00 

Isaiah Sabbath 

School 10.00 

Isaiah Temple .... 10.00 

Joseph, L 100.00 

Katz, Eugene .... 10.00 
Kirchberger, Rich- 
ard S 10.00 

Klee, Max 10.00 

Kohn, Simon A.,. 5.00 

Lebolt, J. Y 10.00 

Leven, Ben 10.00 

•Mandel, Mrs. Emanuel 

Mandel, Mrs. Leon 100.00 
•Mandel, Mrs. Leon- 
Mandel, Simon . . . 5.00 
Mandl, Sidney .... 10.00 
Meyer, Alfred C. .. 10.00 
Michelson, Mrs. H. 5.00 
Orchel, Mrs. I. . . . 5-00 
•Reitler, Chas. 
Rithter, Simon ... 5.00 
Rosenwald, M. S. 5.00 
Rothschild, Maur- 
ice L 500 

Rubovits, Toby . . . 5.00 

Samuels, Caesar .. 10.00 

SchafFner, Chas 50.00 

Schanfaber, Rev. 

Tobias 5.00 

Schwabacher, Mor- 
ris 10.00 

Silberman, Adolph. 25.00 

Solomon, Mr. and 

Mrs. Henry 10.00 



Speyer, Mrs. Etta 

M 10.00 

Stein, Adolph .... 10.00 

Stein, Ignatz, .... 10.00 

Stein, Sam 5.00 

Stein, S. M 5.00 

•Stettauer, Mrs. D. 

Stolz, Rev. Dr. Jos. 5.00 

Stone, A. L 10.00 

Straus, A. S 5.00 

Straus, Meyer L. .. 10.00 

Subert, Mrs. A. . 5.00 

Taussig, M 10.00 

Thorsch, Victor . . 5.00 

Wurmser, Jacob . . 5.00 

Gaiesburg 

Jewish Aid Society 5.00 

Moline 

Rosenstein, L 2.50 

Peoria 

Anshai Emeth Sab- 
bath School .... 1 0.0© 
Levi, Charles Rev. 5.00 
Szold, Esther .... 3.00 
Rocheiie 
•Hilb, Emanuel 

Rock Island 

Mosenfelder, Mrs. 

Louis 5.00 

Simon, L 5-00 

Rushville 
Galowich, Jacob . . S-o" 

Springfield 

Salzenstein, C. S. . 5.00 

Washburn 

Fuiks, Jacob 3.00 

INDIANA 
Angola 

Stiefel, Mrs. L. C. 3-oo 

Attica 

Levor, Levi S. . . . 2.50 

Columbia City 

Ladies' Hebrew 
Benevolent So- 
ciety 3.00 

Fort Wayne 

Ackerman, Abr. ... 10.00 

Baum, Joseph 5.00 

Chaska, Samuel . . . 5.00 

Freiburger, Herman 5.00 

Freiburger, Joseph 5.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



57 



Freiburger, L e o - 

po'id 10.00 

Freiburger, Mrs. 

Simon 5.00 

Greensfelder, Miss 

MoUie 1. 00 

Hollenstein, I. M. . 5.00 
Ladies' Hebrew Be- 
nevolent Society. 10.00 

Lehman, Ben 5.00 

Lehman, Isidor . . . 5.00 

Levy, Ben 5.00 

Nathan, Julius .... 5.00 

Rice, Rabbi Wm. .. 5.00 

Rothschild Bros. .. 5.00 

Rothschild, Ben. . . 5.00 

Rothschild, Sol. ... 5.00 

Stiefel, Mrs. Louis 5.00 

Goshen 

Salinger, Nathan . 5.00 
Hammond 

Wolf, Leo 10.00 

Huntington 

Lauferty, D. E. ... 10.00 

Indianapolis 

Federal ion of Jew- 
ish Chanties 200.0o 

Newberger, Louis. 10.00 
Sommers, Chas. B. 5.00 

Kendailville 
Keller, L. J 5-00 

Kokomo 

Levi, J. S S-OO 

Lafayette 

Jewish Ladies' Aid 

Society 5.00 

Loeb, J. Louis . . . 3.00 

Llgonier 

Hebrew Ladies' Be- 
nevolent Society .. 10.00 

* Straus D. 
Straus, I. D 25.00 

*Straus, Jacob 
Straus, Jacob .... 10.00 

Madison 

Sulzer, Louis 5.00 

Mt. Vernon 

Rosenbaum, Jacob 

and Lee 5.00 

Muncie 

Hene, M 5.00 

Portland 

Weiler, Morris ... 5.00 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Summltvilie 

Children of Anna 
Warner, in her 
memory 15.00 

Jewish Ladies' 
Auxiliary of Sum- 
mitville, Ander- 
son and Elm- 
wood 10.00 

Terre Haute 

Herz, A 5.00 

Wabash 

Hyman, L. L 5-oo 

IOWA 
Charles City 

Hecht, Jos 10.00 

Davenport 

Landauer, Moritz. 5.00 
Decorah 

Bear, Ben 5.00 

Des iVIoines 

B'nai Jeshurun S. 

S 5.00 

Brody, F 5.00 

I'Vankel, A 5.00 

l''rankel, Mrs. B... 10.00 

Sheuerman, L no. op 

Younker, M 5.00 

Keokuk 

Weil, J. B 5.00 

Oskaloosa 

Rosenblatt, Aaron. 5.00 

Sioux City 

Galinsky, H 5.00 

Jewish Ladies' Aid 

Society 10.00 

Mt. Sinai Cong. 

Sabbath School.. 5.00 
*Wise, Mrs. Chas. 

Waverly 

*Slimmer, A. 

KANSAS 
Leavenworth 

Ettenson, Mrs. 

Henry 5.00 

Woolfe & Winnig. 5.00 



Saljna 

Stiefel, Moses . . 

Stiefel, S 

Topeka 

Nattinger, M. S. 



5.00 
5.00 



KENTUCKY 

Bowling Green 

Cristal, Sam'l 5.00 

Nahm, Mrs. Sam'l 5.00 

Danville 

Lyons, Sam and 

Henry 5.00 

Lexington 

Shane, Miss R. ... 5.00 

Strauss, Phil 5.00 

Speyer & Sons . . . 5.00 

Weil, Jonas 5.00 

Wolf, Simon 5.00 

Louisville 

Barkhouse, Louis.. 25.00 

Bernheim, B 25.00 

Bernheim, I. W. . . 25.00 

Blum, S 5.00 

Brooks, Mrs. Marie 5.00 
Council of Jewish 

Women 10.00 

Ehrman, Hilmar . . 5.00 

Flarsheim, M. H... 10.00 

Greenebaum, L. . . 3.00 

Haas, Sam'l 5.00 

Hess, B 5.00 

Kaufman, Henry . 5.00 

Levy, Sol 5.00 

Sabel, & Sons, M. 10.00 

Sachs, Edward . . 5.00 

Sachs, Morris .... 5.00 

Seligman, Alfred . 5.00 

Sloss, Stanley E... S-oo 

Straus, August ... 10.00 

Straus, Benjamin. 10.00 

Straus, Mrs. Sarah 5.00 

Trost Bros 5.00 

Maysville 

Merz, Mrs. A. L. . 5.00 

Merz, Eugene . . . 5.00 

Merz, Millard . . . 5.00 

Owensbcro 

Hirsch, Col. A. .. 10.00 

Rosenfeld, Mrs. A. 10.00 

Paducah 

Benedict, Mrs. J. . 5.00 

Pels, Mrs. E 5.00 

Friedman, Herman 10.00 
Friedman, L. 

Joseph 10.00 

Israel Temple S.S. 5.00 
Weil, Mrs. Jean- 

ette 5.00 



58 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Shelbyville 

The Jewish Liter- 
ary and Social 
Club 10.00 

Samuel, Leopold . . 5.00 

LOUISIANA 

Alexandria 

Posner & Fried . . s-oo 
Simon Bros 10.00 

Jeanerette 

Wormser, M., & 

Co 5.00 

Monroe 

Baer, I., 5.00 

Bloch, J. S 5.00 

Gross, Mrs. Flor- 

antina 2.50 

Meyer, Sol 5.00 

Titche, Chas 5.00 

Napoleonville 

Levy, Maurice . . . 5.00 
New Orleans 

Aschaffenburg, A.. 5.00 
Bruenn, Bernard . 5.00 
Council of Jewish 

Women 25.00 

^District Grand Lodge 

No. 7, I. O. B. B. 
Godchaux, Mrs. 

Paul L 5-00 

Israel, Sam'l 5.00 

Kohlmann, Moss & 

Cottonfelt Mfg. 

Co 5.00 

Kohlmann, Louis . 5.00 
Kohn, Joseph .... 5.00 
Marks Ins. Ag., 

Ltd., Ferd 5.00 

*Newman, Mrs. Henry 
Newman, H. & C. 

Ltd 25.00 

**Newman, Isidore 
Newman, Isidore & 

Son 50.00 

Rosenthal Bros. . . 10.00 

Saal, M. R 5.00 

Stern, Maurice . . . 25.00 
Weis, Julius, Est. 

of 25.00 

St, Francisville 

Teutsch, R 2.50 

Shreveport 

Bernstein, E. R. . . 20.00 

*Life Member 
•'Deceased Life Member 



Heilperin, H. L. . . 5.00 

Phelps, E 5-00 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore 

Adler, Chas. ..... 5.00 

Adler, Simon C. . 5.00 
Adler, Mrs. S. J.. 2.00 
Bernheimer, Ferd- 
inand 25.00 

Burk, Charles .... 5.00 

Cohen, Miss Bertha 5.00 

Drey, Elkan 10.00 

Eisenberg, Abra- 
ham 5.00 

Epstein, Jacob . . . 5.00 

Frank, Solomon . . 10.00 

Goldenberg, Julius. 5.00 
Goldenberg, Mrs. 

R. H 5.00 

Gottschalk, Jos. ... 10.00 

Gottschalk, Levi... 5.00 

Gutmacher, Rev. A. 5.00 

Gutman, Mrs. Joel 5.00 
Hamburger, Manes 

J 5-00 

Hamburger Bros & 

Co 5.00 

Hecht, Mrs. L. A. 10.00 
Hess, Miss Emma 

E 5-00 

Hochschild Max . 5.00 

Hollander, M 5.00 

Katz. Mrs. Zadock 5.00 
Kaufman, Mrs. 

Frank 5.00 

Kraus, Henry .... 5.00 

Lauer, A. C 5.00 

Leopold, Isaac . . . 5.00 

Levy, Wm 10.00 

Oppenheim, Morris 5.00 
Rayner, Albert . . . 5.00 
*Rayner, Wm. S. 
Rosenau, ' Dr. Wil- 
liam 5.00 

Rothholz, J 5.00 

Sonneborn, Henry. 50.00 
Sonneborn, Moses 

S 5-"o 

Sonneborn, Sig. B. 5.00 
Strouse, Mrs. Hen- 

nie 2.00 

Strouse, Isaac . . . 5.00 
Strouse, Mrs. Ma- 
thilda 5.00 

Suskin & Rosen- 
bloom 5.00 

Ulman, Nathan ... 5.00 



Van Leer, Han- 
nah Mrs 5.00 

Walter, Moses R. . 5.00 

Weinberg, Mrs 

Cecelia 5.00 

Westheimer, Henry 

T? S-oo 

Cumberland 

Rosenbaum, Simon 5.00 
Rosenbaum, Sus- 

man 5.00 

Tanzer, Edw 5.00 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 

Agoos, L 10.00 

Agoos, S. L 10.00 

Baer, Louis 10.00 

Fox, Isidor 5.00 

Frank, Meyer .... 10.00 
Goodman, Mrs. 

Sam'l S-oo 

Green, Joseph .... 2.00 
Hailparn, Miss Ju- 
lia S-OO 

*Hecht, Mrs. Lina 
Hillson, H. M. & 

Co S-oo 

Koshland, J S-oo 

Peary, G. 1 5-oo 

Ratshesky, A. C... S-oo 

*Rawitser, Fred. 
Schoener, Joseph 
Y S-oo 

*Shuman, A. 

Brookline 

Andrews, Mrs. 

Julius S-OO 

Kaflenburgh, Mrs. 

1 5-00 

Cambridge 

Greenbaum, Amelia 5.00 

Methuen 
Bon, Abram 5.00 

Roxbury 

Van Noorden, E- . 5-oo 

Waltham 

Bayard, H S-oo 

Worcester 

Coding, Jacob L--- S-oo 
Grodberg & Hirsch. 5.00 

MICHIGAN 

Alma 

Pollasky, M S-oo 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



59 



Bay City 

Greenberg, Karl .. i.oo 

Charlotte 

N'omberg, M 5.00 

Detroit 

Cohen, 1 5.00 

Fechheimer, H. M. 5.00 

Ginsburg, Bernard. 5.00 

Glicman, Mrs. Etta 5.00 

Goldman, A 5.00 

Heineman, Sol. E. 5.00 

Kahn, Albert 10.00 

Rosenfield, Monroe. 5.00 

Rothman, E. M. . . 5.00 

Schloss, Seligman.. 5.00 

Siegel, Benjamin . 5.00 

Sloman, Eugene .. 10.00 

Van Baalen, I ... 10.00 

Wineman, Andrew. 5.00 

Wineman, Henry.. 5.00 

Wineman, L iS-on 

Elk Rapids 

Alpern, H 5.0c 

Grand Rapids 

May, Bernard S. . 5.00 
Wolf, G. A 5.00 

Hawks 

Horwitz, Harris . 5.00 
Lansing 

Jewish Women's 

Aid Society .... 5.00 
Saginaw 

Heavenvich, Max . 5.00 

Sault Ste Marie 

Moses, D. K 10.00 

Wolverine 

Leve, Walter J. . . 5.00 
MINNESOTA 

Austin 

Hirsh, Geo 10. on 

Bemidji 

Bermen, Leah .... 5.00 
Dulutii 

Altschule, S. S. . 5.00 

Bondy, I,. R 5.00 

Minneapolis 

Weil, Isaac 10.00 

St. Paul 

Federation of Jew- 

Uh Charities 100.00 

MISSISSIPPI 

Brookhaven 

Cohn, David Z. . 10.00 

Cohn, Louis 10.00 

*Life Member 
••Deceased Life Member 



Kosciusko 

Jewish Charity 

Fund 5.00 

Meridian 

Moskovitz, A. ... 5.00 
Threefoot, H. M.. 10.00 

Natchez 

*Frank, Henry 
Frank, Henry .... 5.00 
Zerkowsky, Isaac . 5.00 
Vicksburg 

Associated Jewish 

Charities 25.00 

Bock, David 5.00 

The Ladies' He- 
brew Benevolent 
Association 10.00 

Yazoo City 

Wise, H 10.00 

MISSOURI 
Kansas City 

Kansas City Feder- 
ation of Jewish 
Chraittes 3S0.OO 

Levy, Family of 

Isaac 14.00 

Meyer, L 5.00 

Friend 5.00 

Louisiana 

Michael Bros 5.00 

St. Joseph 

Binswanger, I. J... 5.00 

Binswanger, Simon 5.00 

Block, Ellsworth .. 10.00 

Block, Harry 10.00 

Block, Samuel .... 10.00 

Ehrlich, Albert H.. 5.00 

Ehrlich, Wm. H. . . 5.00 

Eliscu, Dr. Fred'k. 5.00 

Feffer, J. A i.oo 

Feltenstein, David. 5.00 

Fishmon, H i.oo 

Handler Bros 5.00 

Hassenbusch, Sam- 
uel 10.00 

Hirsch Bros 5.00 

Hirschhorn, A. S. . 5.00 

Lehman, M. H. ... 5.00 
Lowenstein, Mrs. 

Walter 5.00 

Newburger, Bern- 
hard 10.00 

Oppenheimer, S. H. 5.00 

Phillip, Ben 5.00 

Rosenbleet, E S.oo 



Schloss, Moses A.. 2.00 

Siegel, Lewis 5.00 

Silverman, Eugene. 5.00 

Spear, Jos 5.00 

Wasserkrug, S. H. 5.00 
Westheimer, B. S. 10.00 
Westheimer, D. F. 5.00 
Westheimer, Eu- 
gene F., 10.00 

Westheimer, Ferd- 
inand 25.00 

*Westheimer, Mr. and 

Mrs. Ferdinand 

*Westheimer, Samuel 

Westheimer, Sidney 

F 5.00 

St. Louis 

Bowman, Samuel . 10.00 

Bry, N. & L. ... 5.00 
Drey, Mrs. Lizzie 

H 15.00 

Frohlichstein, S. H. 5.00 

Goldman, 1 10.00 

Green, L. E-, & 

Son 5.00 

Hirsch, Herman . . 5.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. Julia. 5.00 

Levis, Leo 10.00 

Lippman, Jos. M. .. 5.00 

Littman, M 10.00 

Mayer, Herman . . 5.00 

Nathan, Emil 10.00 

*Rice, Jonathan 

Sale, Lee 5.00 

Seelig, S 5.00 

*Stix, C. A. 

Stix, Ernest W. . . 5.00 

Stix, Wm 10.00 

Taussig, Wm 25.00 

Waldheim, A 5.00 

Wolff-Wilson Drug 

Co lo.oo 

Tipton 

Cohn, L 5.00 

MONTANA 

Butte 

Bank, Ben 5.00 

Bank, S s-oo 

Cohn, Louis S. ... 25.00 

Engel, Carl 5.00 

Jonas, Henry 5.00 

Kaufman, J 10.00 

Linz, Mose 5.00 

Lobbenberg, G. A. . 5.00 

Meyer, Wm 5.00 

Oppenheimer, J. E. 25.00 

Perelson, M 5.00 



60 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Pincus, Adolph ... 15.00 

Rosenberg, R. ... 5.eo 

Wein, John H 5.00 

Wein, Julius H. . . 5.00 

Wetzstein, Adolph. 5.00 

Zimmerman, I. ... 5.00 

Great Falls 

Wertheim, Nathan. 5.00 

Helena 

Heller, Robt 5.00 

Missoula 

Leiser, Esther .... S-oo 

NEBRASKA 
Lincoln 

Appel, Ben 5.00 

Cerf Estate 5.00 

Cohen, David R. .. 5.00 

Ellinger, G 5.00 

Fogelson, H 3.00 

Friend, Morris ... 5.00 

Glaser, Chas 5.00 

Gold, Wm 5.00 

Ksensky, Sol. A... 10.00 

Mayer Bros 10.00 

Pepperberg, Julius. 5.00 

Sandlovich, A. S.. 5.00 

Schlesinger, H. .. 10.00 

Seelenfreund, Wm. 5.00 

Sheuerman, M. . . 5.00 

Simon, Ben 5.00 

Speier, H 5.00 

Weil, M 5.00 

Omaha 

Elgutter, C. S. ... 5.00 

Gluck, Israel .... 5.00 

Heller, Leopold . . 5.00 

Katz, J. B 5.00 

Kirschbaum, L. & 

N 10.00 

Levi, 1 5.00 

Levy, M 10.00 

Rosenthal, B. & H. 5.00 

Rosewattr, Victor 5.00 

Rubel, Edgar S. . . 5.00 
Seligsohn, Mr. and 

Mrs. Elkan .... 10.00 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 

Latz, Caroline . . . 5.00 
Wineburg, Miss 

Josephine 5.00 

Camden 

Blank, J. Z 5.00 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Van Sciver, J. B. . 10.00 

East Orange 

Back, Albert 5.00 

Montclair 

Hirsh, Mrs. Sam- 
son 5.00 

Newark 

Bamberger, Louis . 10.00. 

Foster, Rev. Sol... 5.00 

Fuld, Felix 25.00 

Goetz, Joseph 5.00 

Michael, Chas. . . . 5.00 

Michael, Oscar . . . 5.00 

Plaut, Moses 5.00. 

Steiner, Joseph ... S-oo 

Stern, Mrs. Carrie 5.00 

Straus, M., & Sons 5.00 
Piainfield 

Newcorn, Wm. . . . 5.00 

Somerville 

Mack, Alexander 

W 5.00 

Mack, Mrs. Louise 5.00 

NEW MEXICO 

Albuquerque 

Schweizer, Her- 
man 10.00 

Sante Fe 

Hersch, Mrs. Jos. . 5.00 

Jaffa, Mrs. Nathan 5.00 
Wagon Mound 

Vorenberg, Simon . 5.00 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Durham 

Kronheimer, B. F. 5.00 

Goldsboro 

Weil, Mrs. Henry 5.00 

Weil, Leslie 5.00 

Weil, Sol 10.00 

Greensboro 

Cone, Caesar .... 10.00 

Statesville 

Hebrew Ladies' Aid 
Society 5.00 

Wilmington 

Jacobi, Mrs. Jos. N. 5.00 

Solky, J. M 5.00 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Fargo 

Stern, Max 5.00 

NEW YORK 
Albany 



Cong. Beth Emeth. 25.00 
Sporborg, Mrs. 

Henry J 5.00 

Stiefel, Jos. L 10.00 

Waldman, Louis I. 10. o» 

Binghamton 

Hirschmann, Sig- 

mund J 5.00 

Brooklyn 

**Abraham, A. 

Abraham, Mrs. A. 100.00 

Blum, Edw. C. ... 10.00 

Gibb, Walter 5.00 

In Sympathy 2.00 

Joachim, Chas. J... 10.00 

Miskind, Isidor . . 5.00 

Rothchild, S. F. .. 10.00 

Sternau, S 5.00 

Werbelovsky, Jacob 5.00 

Werbelovsky, David 5.00 

Buffalo 

Block, Mrs. Jos. .. 10.00 

Boasberg, Emanuel 5.00 
Fleischmann, S i - 

mon 5.00 

Jacobson, S 5.00 

Keiser, August ... 5.00 

Keiser, L 10.00 

Keiser, Leopold .. 10.00 

Shroder, Milton .. S.oe 

Spangenthal, A ... 5.00 

Wile, Herman .... 5.00 

*WinkIer, Mrs. R. S. 

Winters, A 10. oe 

Elmira 

Council of Jewish 

Women 5.00 

Friendly, H 3.00 

Far Rockaway 

Eiseman, Stella ... s-o» 
Glen Falls 

Baumann. Julius P. 5.0* 

Gloversville 

Littauer, Lucius N. 50.o« 
Herkimer 

Schermer, Benj. .. i.o* 

Newburgh 

Stroock, Jos i5.o« 

Niagara Falls 

*Silverberg, Bertha 
Silberberg, Moses 

L 5-o« 

Olean 

Marcus, H. W. . . s.o» 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



61 



Rochester 

Adler, Abram .... lo.oo 

Adier, Isaac lo.oo 

Adler, Mrs. Lewis. 5.00 

Adler, Simon 5.00 

Adler, Solomon ... 5.00 

Benjamin, A. E). . . 5.00 

David, Marcus . . . 5.00 

Ettenheimer, S. L,. 5.00 

Friedlich, 1 10.00 

Friedman, Mrs. 

Jos. N 25.00 

Garson, Mrs. F. A. 5.00 
Hickey-Freeman 

Co 5-00 

Katz, Abraham J.. 10.00 
Kerstein, E- Sons 

Co S-oo 

Kirstein, Mrs. J. 

F. 10.00 

Kochenthal, Marcus 5.00 

*Lowenthal, M. 

Meyers, M. M. . . 5.00 

Michaels, Jos 20.00 

Miller, William . . 5.00 

Rosenbloom, Max. 5.00 

*Silberberg, M. 

*Silberberg, G. 

*Silberberg, G. 

Stern, Isaac S-oo 

Stern, Morley A. . . 10.00 

Weil, Katherine M. 5.00 

Weill, Samuel 5.00 

Wile, Julius M. .. 10.00 

Wile, Mrs. Carrie. 5.00 

■ Wile Sol 10.00 

Schenectady 

Lichtenberg, Ches- 
ter 10.00 

Syracuse 

Eisner, Henry . . . 5.00 
Jacobson, Nathan, 

Dr 10.00 

Levy, T. Aaron 5.00 

New York City 

Alexander, Arthur 

A 500 

Alexander, Leo . . S-oo 

Alland, Maurice .. 5.00 

Armstrong, Paul.. 5.00 

Auerbach, Louis .. 10.00 

Austrian, Mrs. J.. S-oo 

Backer, George ... 25.00 

Bash, Henrietta . . 20.00 

Bauer, Abram .... 5.00 

Beer, Mrs. J 10.00 

Beller, A 10.00 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Benjamin, Geo. G. 5.00 

Benjamin, M. W. . 10.00 
Bernheimer, Max 

E 10.00 

Berolzheimer 

Emil 25.00 

Bijur, Nathan .... 10.00 

Bing, A. M 10.00 

Blaustein, Dr. 

David .... 5.00 
Bloomingdale, Mrs. 

J. B 10.00 

Blum, Jos. A 10.00 

*Elumenthal, Geo. 

Blum, F. S. M... 3.00 
Bookman, Mrs. 

Jacob 5.00 

Bookman, Estate of 

J 10.00 

Borg, The Misses 

Elsie and Edith. 30.00 

Bowsky, Louis . . . 5.00 

Brand, Herman . . 5.00 

Brill, 1 5-00 

*Budge, Henry 
Buttenwieser, Jos. 

L 10.00 

M 10.00 

Conheim, Herman. 10.00 

Cohen, Joseph H.. 10.00 

Cohen, Max 10.00 

Cohn, Salo 5.00 

Danenbaum, Chas. 5.00 

De Boer, David H. 5.00 

Denzer, E S.oo 

Dreyfuss, Ludwig.. 10.00 

Einstein, J 10.00 

Eiseman. S 10.00 

Erb, Newman .... 10.00 

Erlanger, A 25.00 

Estricher, Henry.. 5.00 

Falck, Harry 5.00 

Fauer, Philip .... 5.00 

Fechheimer, C. ... 5.00 

Fischer, Isi 5.00 

Fleischer, Nathan. 5.00 
Floersheimer, Sam- 
uel & Bro 10.00 

Frank. Mrs. A. B. 10.00 
Friedman, Sol. & 

Co 10.00 

Fuerst, Albert F... 5.00 

Glass, Henry 10.00 

Glazier, Mrs. S. W. 25.00 

Goldberg, D 5-oo 

Goldberg, Isaac ... 10.00 

Goldenberg, S. L.. 5-oo 

Goldsmith, Herman 5.00 



•Goodhart, Philip J. 

Gottheil, Paul .... 5.00 

Greenhut, J. B. .. 50.00 

Grossman, Emil . . 5-0° 

Gruber, Abraham . 10.00 
*Guggenheimer, Wm. 

Guinzburg, Victor.. 25.00 
*IIays, Daniel P. 

Heavenrich, Jvilius. i.oo 

*Heinsheimer, Alfred M. 
Hendricks, Mrs. 

Chas 10.00 

*Hermann, Ferdinand 

Hermann, Julius . 10.00 

Herrman, Nathan. 5.00 

Hilder, Moritz 10.00 

Hill, Clare A 5.00 

Holzman, Ascher . 10.00 

Holzman, S. L. . . 5-00 
Horkheimer, Es- 

telle S 10.00 

Hyman, Mrs. Jos. 30.00 

Iku, Chas. F 5-00 

Jacobson, Henry H. 10.00 

Jonas, William ... 25.00 

, Kahn, Leopold ... 10.00 

Kahn, Louis 5.00 

Kauffman, Herbert 

M 10.00 

Kaufman, Julius . 10.00 
*Kaufmann, B. 

Kayser, Julius . . . 10.00 

Klein, Mrs. Babette 5.00 

Kleinert, I. B. 10.00 

Klingenstein, Mrs. 

Chas 5-0O 

Kohlman, Charles.. 10.00 
Kohnstamm, Leo, 
Edward and Jos- 
eph 2500 

*Krauskopf, Mary G. 
Krauskopf, Nathan. 100.00 
Krower, Louis .... 10.00 
Ladenburger, Theo- 
dore 25.00 

Lang, Gabe S-oo 

Lauterbach, Edw. . 10.00 

Leventritt, David. 10.00 

Levi, Emil S 5-oo 

Levi, Henlein .... 5-oo 

Levi, Mrs. Leo N. 5.00 

Levine, J. Clarence 25.00 

Levor, Gustav .... 10.00 

Levy, Morris 5.00 

*Lewisohn, Adolph 
Lewisohn, The 

Misses 350.00 

Lewisohn, Sam A. 10.00 

Loeb, Emil 5-oo 



62 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Loeb, Louis 5.00 

Loewenstein, Her- 
man 5-00 

Lorsch, Henry . . . 10.00 
Lowenthal, Mrs. 

Julius 15-00 

Mack, Fred A. ... 10.00 
**Mack, Jacob W. 

Mack, Marc H. .. losoo 
Martin, Herbert 

Spencer 10.00 

Mattersdorfer, 

Frank S-oo 

♦Marshall, Louis 

Mautner, Julius .. 10.00 

Mayer, Otto h. ■ ■ ■ 10.00 

Mendelson, Leon . 10.00 

Meyer, D. F 10.00 

Meyer, Harrison D. 20.00 
•Meyer, Wm. 

Modry, 1 3-oo 

Morganstern, Al- 
bert G 25.00 

Morgenthau, Gus- 

tave L 10.00 

Morgenthau, Henry 10.00 
Moses, Rev. Isaac 

S 5-00 

Nathan, Fred 10.00 

Naumberg, Elkan . . 50.00 
Ochs, Adolph S. .. 25.00 
Openhym, Augus- 
tus W 10.00 

Openhym, Mrs. 

Wm 5-00 

Oppenheim, Mrs. 

Laurent 5-oo 

Oppenheimer, Z. 

H 10.00 

Ottinger, Marx . . 10.00 

Peierls, Siegfried.. 10.00 

Pulaski, M. H. ... 10.00 

Rice, S. M 25.00 

Rich, Mrs. S 10.00 

Rosenbaum, Selig. 25.00 

Rossbach, Leopold 10.00 

Rossbach, Jacob .. 10.00 

Rothschild, Jacob . 5-0° 

Rothschild Louis F. lo.oo 
Rothschild, Mrs. 

Wm 5-00 

Sachs, Harry 25.00 

Sachs, Louis 10.00 

Sachs, Paul J 10.00 

Sachs, Samuel . . . 25.00 

Saks, Isadore .... 5.00 
*Salomon, Wm. 

Schaffner, Abe . . . 5-oo 

•Life Member 
••Deceased Life Member 



Schiff, Isaac 5.00 

Schiff, Jacob H. .. 100.00 
Schoenfeld, Mrs. 

David 5.00 

Scholle, Mellville J. 5.00 
Seligman, Mrs. De 

Witt J 10.00 

Seligman, Jeffer- 
son 25.00 

•Sidenberg, G. 

Sidenberg, Henry.. 5.00 
•Silberberg, G. 

Silver, S. L 5.00.. 

Silverberg, A. S. . 10.00 

Simon, R. E 10.00 

Sondheim, Max ... 5.00 

Stein, Abraham . . 10.00 

Steinam, Abraham. 10.00 

Steiner, David . . . 10.00 

Steiner, Joseph ... 10.00 
Steiner, Joseph & 

Bros 10.00 

Steinhardt, Henry. 10.00 

Stern, Benjamin .. 10.00 

Stern, Leopold ... 10.00 

Stern, Leopold . . . 5.00 

Strasser, Wm. W. . 5.00 

Straus, Isidor .... 100.00 

Stroock, Louis S.. 5.00 
Stroock, Robert 

Louis 5.00 

Sulzberger, Cyrus.. s-o" 
Tannenbaum, Sr., 

Leon 10.00 

Toch, Henry M. . . S-oo 
Toch, Maximilian 10.00 
Tuska, Benjamin.. 10.00 
Ufland, Abraham. . 5.00 
Untermeyer, Hen- 
ry 5.00 

Van Raalte, Z.... 5.00 

Veit, B 10.00 

Vollter, A 5-oo 

Vorhaus, J. & Sons 5.00 
•Warburg, Felix M. 
•Warburg, Paul M. 

Weil, Max 10.00 

Weinberg, A 10.00 

Werner, Adolph, 

Prof 10.00 

Wertheim, Jacob . 10.00 
Weyl, Dr. Walter 

E 5-00 

Wineburgh, Jesse . 5.00 

Wolf, Sam 5.00 

Wolfe, S. Herbert. 5.00 
Wolff, Mrs. Alfred 

R 25.00 



Wolff, A. L 10.00 

Wolff, Lewis S.... 10.00 

Wollman, Wm. J.. 10.00 

Woolf, Morris L. .. 25.00 

Younker, Herman. 10.00 

Zeckendorf. Louis. 5.00 

Zinke, Isaac L. ... 10.00 

Zinke, Louis 10.00 

OKLAHOMA 
Oklahoma City 

Engleman, A. D. .. 5.00 

Herschland, Ben. . 5.00 
Tulsa 

Cohen, Isaac 5.00 

OHIO 
Akron 

The Akron Schwes- 

terband 5.00 

Polsky, A 10.00 

Archbold 

Hirsch, Henry .... 10.00 

Bellalre 

Blum, Mrs. Henry 5.00 

Blum, Isaac 5.00 

Bluff ton 

Wise Bros 5.00 

Canton 

Ladies' Hebrew Aid 

Society 10.00 

Stein, Mrs. Max . . 5.00 

Stern, Miss Mary. 5.00 

Chillicothe 

Schachne, Moritz.. 5.00 
Cincinnati 

Ach, Samuel 5.00 

Ault, W. B 10.00 

Bernheim, E. Pal- 
mer 5.00 

Bettman, Levi .... 10.00 
Bettmann, Bern- 
hard 5.00 

Bing, Mrs. Ida ... 10.00 

Block, Abe 5.00 

Block, Joseph E. . 5. 00 

Block, Leon 5.00 

•Block, Samuel 

Dreifus, David S. 5.00 

Eichberg, Harry . , 5.00 

Englander, 1 5.00 

Ezekiel, Henry C. . 3.00 

Ezekiel, Miss Sallie 5.00 

Fox, Burton 5.00 

Fox, Henry 5.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



63 



Fox, Solomon .... lo.oo 
Frank, Miss Paul- 
ine 5.00 

Freiberg, Abr lo.oo 

Freiberg, Bernard. 5.00 

Freiberg, Harry A.. 5.00 

Freiberg, J. W. . . 5.00 

Freiberg, Maurice J. 25.00 

Fries, Gus R 5.00 

Furst, Joseph 10.00 

Greenbaum, Wal- 
ter G S.oo 

Guggenheim, EH... S-oo 

Hahn, Henry .... 5.00 

Holzman, Wallace. 5.00 

Huttenbauer, Emil. 10.00 

Johnson, D. I. ... 10.00 

Jonap, Henry .... 5.00 

Kaufman, Eli B. . . s-o" 

Kaufman, Lee .... 5.00 

Klein, Joseph D. . . 10.00 

*Klein, Samuel 

Krohn, Irwin M. .. 5.00 

Krohn, Louis 5.00 

Lavin, Samuel .... i.oo 

Lefkowits, Charles. 5.00 

Levy, Harry M. . . 5.00 

*Lowman, Leo J. 

Magnus, Jos. A. .. 10.00 

Marks, Leslie V. . 5.00 

Marx, Louis 10.00 

May, Bros 5.00 

Mayer, E 10.00 

Mayer, Mrs. L. • ■ S-oo 

•Meis, Henry 

Meis, Nathan, ... 10.00 

Meiss, Harry 5.00 

Meiss, Leon S-oo 

Mendel, Henry ... 10.00 

Miller, E. L S-oo 

Moch, E. J 10.00 

Newbauer, Adolf. . 25.00 

Nusbaum, M 10.00 

Ottenheimer, Jacob 5.00 

Peyser, Sol. D. . . . S-oo 

Phillips, Godfrey J. 10.00 

Plant, Aaron ..... 5.00 

Pollak, Emil 10.00 

Pritz, Carl E S-oo 

Pritz, Sidney E. . . S-oo 

Rauh, Louis S. ... 5.00 

•Reiter, A. 
Rheinstrom, Sig- 

mund 5.00 

Rosenthal, Samuel. 10.00 

Rosenthal, Wm. H. 5.00 

Rothschild, Lester. 5.00 
Seasongood, Alfred, 

Est. of 10.00 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Seinsheimer, Mrs. 

Samuel 5.00 

Shane, Mrs. Eva.. i.oo 

Shohl, Chas S-oo 

Silverglade, M. . . 5.00 
Springer, Dr. Al- 
fred 5-00 

Stark, Dr. Sigmar. 10.00 

Stein, Hugo 10.00 

Stern, Max 10.00 

Stix, Mrs. Fanny. . 5.00 

Straus, Samuel . . . 10.00 

Strauss, Albert I... 10.00 
* Sturm, Simon 
Thurnauer, Charles 

M 5-00 

Trager, I. Newton, 5.00 
Trager, Mrs. Isi- 
dore 10.00 

Trager, J. Garfield S-oo 

Trost, Saml. W. .. 10.00 

Trounstine, Victor. 5.00 

Troy, Ernest 10.00 

Ullman, Adolph .. S-oo 
Wallenstein, Geo. 

W S-oo 

Wertheimer, Em... 10.00 
Westheimer, Irwin 

F S-oo 

Westheimer, Leo.F. 10.00 
Westheimer, Mor- 
ris F 10.00 

Winkler, EH S-oo 

Winkler, Mrs. I. .. S-oo 

Wolfstein, Jesse, . . 5-00 

Wyler, Isaac A... S-oo 

Cleveland 

Braham, L. A. ... 10.00 

Dauby, N. L S-oo 

Daughters of Is- 
rael, Lodge No. I S-oo 
Eisenman, Chas. . . S-oo 
Forchheimer, B. . . 5.00 

Friedman, J S-oo 

Gries, Rabbi M. J.. 10.00 

Gross, Sam'l S-oo 

Halle, Mrs. Manuel 10.00 

Hartman, Sam'l . . 5.00 

Hays, Clarence J.. 5.00 

Hays, Joseph S-oo 

Hexter, Kaufman 

W S-oo 

Joseph, Isaac 10.00 

Joseph, Sigmund . . S-oo 

Landesman, Ida . . 10.00 

Lowenstein, Ben . 5.00 

Mahler, B 10.00 

Marks, M. A 5.00 

New, Benj 5.00 



New, Harry .... 


S-oo 


Peskind, Dr. A. 


10.00 


Shlesinger, H, . . 


5.00 


Shlesinger, Sig . 


S-oo 


Stearn, Abraham 


10.00 


Weil, Meyer . . . 


5.00 


Wolf, L. J 


10.00 


Columbus 




Basch, Jacob . . . 


S-oo 


*B'nai Israel Sisterhood 



Goldstein, Jacob . . 10.00 

*Lazarus, Frederick 

*Lazarus, Ralph 
Lieberman, S 10.00 

* Miller, Leopold 
Rosenthal, Eugene. S-oo 
Schoenthal, Jos. . 10.00 
Weiler, Miss Amy S-oo 

*Zion Lodge No. 62 
I. O. B. B. 

Crestline 

Reder, Jake 5.00 

Dayton 

Ach, F. J 10.00 

Daneman, Mrs. Jac- 
ob I.oo 

Lessner, Adam • . . 5.00 

Gallon 

Gottdiener, H S-oo 

Hamilton 

Kahn, Felix 5.00 

Kahn, Lazard .... 5.00 

Newburgh, Louis.. 5.00 
Strauss, Meyer, 

Children of .... 50-00 

Lima 
Michael, N. L S-oo 

Lorrain 

Klein, Jacob S 10.00 

Marion 

Council of Jewish 
Women 7-oo 

Massillon 

Bloomberg, H. A.. 5.00 

Daughters of Zion S-oo 
Mt. Vernon 

Meyers, Mrs. Max. 5.00 

New Philadelphia 

Alexander, Mrs. 

Fred 10.00 



Piqua 

Anshe Emeth Cong. 

Plymouth 

Spear, Mrs. Sol. . . 



5-00 



5-00 



64 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Portsmouth 

Jacobs, Max 5.00 

Mayer, A s-oo 

Sandusky 

Kaplan, Samuel ... 5.00 

Springfield 

Jewish Ladies' Aid 

Society 5.00 

Steubenville 

Sulzbacher, Isidor. 10.00 

Toledo 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Chari:iss 100.00 

Landman, Otto . . 5.00 
Wooster 

Freedlander, Mrs. 

I S-oo 

Youngstown 

Grossman, Dr. J. 

B 5.00 

Guthman, Leo . . . 5.00 

Hebrew Ladies' 
Benevolent So- 
ciety 5.00 

Hirshberg, B 5.00 

Regenstreich, L--.. 5.00 

Strouss, 1 5.00 

•Theobald, Mrs. C. 

Weil, Mrs. Samuel. 5.00 

Zanesville 

. Starr, A. E 5.00 

OREGON 

Portland 

Barde, M 5.00 

Bernstein, Alex. . 10.00 

Baskowitz, A. ... 5.00 

Bromberger, S. ... 5.00 

Cohen, David Solis 10.00 

Cohen, Eugene . . . 5.00 

Cohn, Marcus .... 5.00 

Davidson, Abe . . . 5.00 

' Dellar, John 5.00 

Feldenheimer, Al- 
bert 5.00 

Feldenheimer, 

Chas 5.00 

Fleischner, M. and 

N 20.00 

Friedenthal, J. ... 5.00 

Germanus, D 5.00 

Goldsmith, R 10.00 

Hart, Sol 10.00 

Herrman, S. W. .. 10.00 

Hirsch, Max S. . . 5.00 

Holzman, Bros. . . 5.00 

Renin, S. B 5.00 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Klaber, Herman . . 5.00 

Lang, M 10.00 

Lauberstein, J. ... 5.00 

Lesser, J 5.00 

Levy, M. 5.00 

Loeb, Mrs. EHsa .. 10.00 

May, E 10.00 

Mosessohn, David 

N. & M 10.00 

Neustadter Bros. . 25.00 
Nusbaum & Neme- 

rovsky 5. 00 

Ricen, Jos. M 5.00 

Rosenblatt, Sam'I & 

Co 5.00 

Rothschild, Fred 

H 5.00 

- Seller, F. M 10.00 

Selling, Benj 25.00 

Shemanski, J 10.00 

Shub, L S-OO 

Sichel, M. 10.00 

Simon, Gustave . . 25.00 

Swett, 1 5.00 

Swett, Z 5-00 

Tilzer, Dr. A 5.00 

Wax, Meyer 5.00 

Weinstein, N. & S. 5-0° 
11 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Allegheny 
*Rauh, Mrs. Rosalie 

Altoona 

*Kline, Henry S. 
Allentown 

Heinz, Maurice . . 5.00 

Hess, Chas. and 

Max 10.00 

Keine, Henry S. 

Bethlehem 

Reis, Louis 5.00 

Berwick 

Schain, Jos. M. . . . 10.00 

Braddock 

Katz, Leo A 5.00 

Bradford 

Greenewald, David 

C 5-00 

Carlisle 

Berg, Miss Selraa . 10.00 
Chester 

Levy, Moses i.oo 

Coatesville 

Brauenstein, Isaac. lo.oo 

Marcus, Jacob . . . 5.00 



Doylestown 

Shoemaker, H. J. 5.»o 

Easton 

Grollman Bros. . . . 5.00 

Hellman, Israel ... 5.00 

Hochmann, I. B... i.oo 

Kaplan, Max 5.00 

Mayer, Jacob 5.00 

Peoples Clothing 

Co I.oo 

Ralph Bros 5.00 

Ralph, Herman . . . 5.00 

Sherer, S 5.00 

Erie 

Sobel, Isidore .... 5.00 
Harrisburg 

Astrich, Herman .. 10.00 

Claster, Jos 5.00 

Hazelton 

Benjamin, David.. 5.00 
Friedlander, M. . . 5.00 

Jenkintown 

Silberman, Max . . 5.00 

Johnstown 

Rothstein, M 5.00 

Klttaning 
Einstein, Jacob . . . 5.00 

Lancaster 

Cohen, E. M S-oo 

Hecht, Mrs. Henri- 

ette 5.00 

Moss, S. R 5-00 

Rich, Israel " 5.00 

Rosenthal, Morris . 5.00 

Siesel, Samuel .... 10.00 

Langhorne 

*Branson, I L,. 

Luzerne 

Freedman, Max.... j.o* 

McKeesport 

Friedman, Henry.. s.o» 

Marion Station 

Windrin, Jas. H... 35. o» 

New Castle 

Feuchtwanger, Mar- 
cus S-o* 

Oil City 

Brounschonger, 

M., Jr !«.©• 

Pittsburgh 
Aronson, I. Leon- 
ard $■•• 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



65 



Benswanger, E. . . S-oo 
•Browarsky, Max 

Cerf, Miss Emma 

K 5-00 

•Cohen, Aaron 
*Cohen, Josiah 

De Roy, Jos. . . . 5.00 
•Dreifus, C. 

Edel, Jacob 25.00 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Phi anthropies 500.00 

Floersheim, B e r - 

thold S-oo 

•'Frank, Samuel, by his son 
E. K. 
Goldsmit, Louis . . 5.00 

•Guckenheimer, Isaac 

•Hamburger, Philip 

•Hanauer, A. M. 
Kahn, Leo M 25.00 

•Kaufman Bros. 
Kaufmann, Isaac . 10.00 
Kaufman, Nathan. 5.00 
Lipman, Harry M. 5.00 

•Marcus, Aaron 
Raphael, Jacob ... 10.00 
Raphael, Ralph I. . 5.00 
Rauh, Marcus .... 5.00 
Rothchild, M. N... 5.00 
Solomon, Kaskel .. 10.00 

•Solomon & Rubin 
Stadfield, Joseph . 5.00 
Sunstein, Mrs. A. 
J 10.00 

•Weil, A. Leo. 
Weil, A. Leo 25.00 

•Weil, J. 

Pittston 

Brown, Albert .... 10.00 

Pottstown 

Mosheim, S i.oo 

Weitzenkorn, Mor- 
ris 5-00 

Reading 

Baer, 1 5-oo 

Bash, Wm 5.00 

Cohen Bros 3.00 

Goldman, E 5-oo 

Schweriner S. S. . . 10.00 

Sondheim, Jonas,.. 5.00 

Whiteson, Mrs. I. 5.00 

Rochester 

Rapport, H. T. ... 5.00 

Scranton 

Epstein, M. L. ... 5-oo 

Heinz, B 10.00 

Kleeman, Oscar ... 5.00 

•Life Member 
••Deceased Life Member 



Krotosky Brothers. 10.00 

Levy, K S-oo 

Moses, B 5-00 

Oettinger, Louis . . 5.00 

Roos, Dr. EHas J.. 5.00 

Selin's Grove 

Weis, S S-oo 

Shamokin 

Gelb, W. B., & Co. s-oo 

Titusville 

Berwald, H. P S-oo 

Uniontown 

Rosenbaum, Sol. J. 5.00 

Wellsboro 

Finkelstein, Mrs. 

Louis B 5-00 

Wilkes-Barre 

Davidow, Edward 

B S-O"^ 

Hurwitz, Jos 5-oo 

Lazarus, H 10.00 

Long, Mrs. Dora . . 5.00 
Marks, Mrs. Lillian 

U S-oo 

Stern, Harry F. .. 5.00 

Strauss, S. J 5-oo 

Williamsport 

Goldenberg, C. N., 

& Co 2.50 

York 

Lebach, Lena Mrs.. 3-00 
Lehmayer, N 10.00 

Philadelphia 

Acker, Finley .... 5-0° 

Baird, J. E 10.00 

Baum, Saml S-oo 

Beckman, S 10.00 

*Betz & Son 
Blank, Mrs. H; . . . 2.00 

*Bloch, B. B. 
Block, Mrs. Nathan 2.00 
Blum, Gabriel 20.00 

*Elum, Ralph 
**Blumenthal, Herman 
**Blumenthal, Sol. 

Boutelji, Rose 10.00 

*Byers, Jos. J. 

*C]othier, Isaac H. 

Cohen, Isaac 10.00 

Delaney & Co. ... 5-oo 
From a Friend ... 5.00 

'Federation of Jewish 
Charities 

Fe<'erafop of Jew- 
ish Charities 7500.00 

Faldstein, Mrs. 

Adolph 5-00 



Feustman, Maurice 

M S-oo 

•Fleisher, Martha S. 
Fleisher, Mrs. H. 

H 500 

Freeman, Mrs. 

Louis 10.00 

Fuguet, Howard... 10.00 
Cans, Adele B. . . . 10.00 
Gans, Mrs. Jeanette 5.00 
Geiger, Mary S. . . 10.00 

Ginsburg, M 15-00 

♦Grant, Adolph 
Goldman, George . S-oo 

Graves, N. Z S-oo 

Greensfelder, Jos.. 10.00 
Gross, Maurice .. 15.00 
Hanigbaum, Miss 

Hettie 2-00 

•Harrison, C. C. 
•Hagedorn, Mrs. Alice 
Heebner, Sam'l ... S-oo 
Heidelberger, Chas. 5.00 
Hensell, Colladay 

& Co S-oo 

Herzberg, Mrs. L.. S-oo 
Herzberg, Mrs. Wal- 
ter S-oo 

Hess, Mrs. Aaron. S-oo 
Hilbronner, Fannie 5.00 
HJrsh, Mrs. Ga- 
briel 10.00 

Hyneman, Jacob B. 10.00 
Isaacs, Mrs. Rachel 10.00 
Israel, Abraham Mr. 

and Mrs 10.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. S 5-oo 

Jessar, B. Z 5-oo 

••Jonas, Herman 
•Kaas, Andrew 
Kahn, Mrs. Jacob 

C I S-oo 

Kaufman, Mrs. Jos. 5.00 
Kaufman, Max & 

Morris lo-oo 

•Kaufmann, Morris A. 
•Kayser, Samuel 
Klinordlineer, A... 15.00 
Knight, Maj. M. T. 25.00 
•Krauskopf, Harold 

Kohn, Arnold 10.00 

Lane, David H. ... 25.00 
•Langfeld, A. M. 

Liny, Isaac, S-oo 

•Levy, Sol.. 
Lieberman, M. & S. 25.00 
Lieberman, Mrs. . . 25.00 
Lippman, Mrs. H. 10.00 



66 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



*Lit, S. D. 
Loeb, Hortense H. 5.00 

Lubin, S 200.00 

Marquis, A 35-00 

Marshall, Jacob . . 5.00 
**Merz, Daniel 
*Merz, Mrs. Regina 
Miller, Wm. W. . 23.00 
The Moore & White 

Co 5.00 

•Morris, Effingham B. 
*Muhr, Jacob 
Morris, Mrs. Nettie 5.00 
Myers, Mrs. Yette 5.00 
Nachod, Julius E. S-oo 
Netter, Mrs. Theo. 5.00 
Norris, Dr. Geo. W. 5.00 
Oppenheamer, Mr. 

and Mrs. Max.. 5.00 
Ostheimer, Wm. J. 5.00 
**Pepper, Dr. Wm. 
**Pfaelzer, Simon 
Pimentel, Mrs. 

Kate 5.00 

*Raab, Mrs. Julia 

Raff, A. Raymond. 5.00 
*Reform Con. Keneseth 
Israel 
Rolph, Wm. T. . . . 5.00 
**Rorke, Allen . 
*Rosenberg, Grace 
*Rosenberg, Walter I. 
*Rosenberg, Walter J. 
Rosengarten, J. G. 20.00 
Rosenthal, Harry . 10.00 
Rothschild, S. ... 5.00 
Rubin, Mrs. Jos. . . 20.00 
Samuel, Dr. J. 

Bunford 10.00 

Samuel, Mrs. J. 

Bunford 10.00 

*Schloss, Mrs. Herman 
*Schoch, Henry R. 
Schwacke, J. H. . . 5.00 
Schwartz, Jacob . . • 5.00 
Schwerin, B. G. . . 5.00 
Sealer, Mrs. Edgar 

V 10.00 

Sharp, S. S ." 10.00 

Showell, E;. B. ... 5.00 
*SiIberman, Mrs. Ida 
Silberman, Mrs. 

Ida 25.00 

* Silverman, I. H. 
**Snellenberg, J. J. 
*Snellenberg, Nathan 
*Snellenberg, Samuel 
Simon, Sim J. ... 15.00 



Snellenburg, N. . . 500.00 

Springer, E 5.00 

Stamm, Jos 5.00 

Steinhart, Mrs. 

Frances 3,00 

Stern, Harry L,.-. 10.00 
*Sternberger, Samuel 
Strouse, Dr. Fred- 
eric M 10.00 

Sundheim, Bertha. 10.00 
"Swaab, M. M., Jr. 
*'Teller, Benj. F. 

*Teller, Mrs. B. F. 
**Teller, Jos. R. 
Teller, Mrs. Louis 

L 25.00 

*Trautman, Dr. B. 
Walter, Simon . . . 5.00 
Wells, Geo. B. ... 10.00 
*Wanamaker, John 
**Weiler, Herman 

Weyl Bros 10.00 

Wilson & Richards 5.00 
*WoIf, I., Jr. 

Work, R. D 25.00 

**Zweighaft, Simon 

RHODE ISLAND 
Providence 

Misch, Mrs. Caesar 5.00 

SOUTH CAROLINA 
Florence 

Sulzbacher, S. I... 10.00 

Rock Hill 

Friedheim, Julius. 5.00 
Friedheim, Samuel 100.00 

TENNESSEE 
Clarksville 

Adier, M 10.00 

Knoxvilie 

Rosenthal, D. A. . 5.00 

Memphis 

Federation of Jewish 

Charities 20.000 

Roth, lyouis 5.00 

Nashville 

Cohen, Nathan . . 5.00 

Federation of Jewish 

Charities 75. 00 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities . . . 75.00 
Goodman, H., Jr... 5.00 
Loveman, Adolph.. 5.00 
Loventhal, Lee J. 5.00 



TEXAS 
Beaumont 

Deutser, B 5.00 

Ladies Benevolent 

Society 10.00 

Big Springs 

Fisher, Mrs. Anna 5.00 
Crawford 

Marks, M 10.00 

Dallas 

Dreyfuss, G 5.00 

Goldsmith, Isidore 5.00 
Hexter, Victor 

Henry iq.oo 

Kahn, E. M 25.00 

Kahn, J 5.00 

Kramer, Arthur .. 5.00 
Levi, Mrs. There- 
sa 5.00 

Linz, Simon 5.00 

Myers, Seymour . 5.00 

Ortlieb, Max 5.00 

Sanger Bros 5.00 

*Sanger, Alexander 
*Sanger, Mrs. Philip 
*Silberstein, A. 

Swope, Jos 10.00 

Ullman, J 5.00 

El Paso 

Aronstein, S 5.00 

Kohlberg, E 5.00 

Stolaroff, 1 5.00 

Temple Mt. Sinai 

S. S 10.00 

Fort Worth 

Bath, Felix P. ... 20.00 

Brann, H 25.00 

Brown, Isidor . . . 5.00 

Chanowsky, J. ... 5.00 
Council Jewish 

Women 5.00 

Eppstein, M. L. . . 25.00 

Fox, M. S. G. ... s.oo 

Friedman, Mrs. A. 5.00 

Friend, Alex M. . . 15.00 

Frend, Henry M. . 10.00 

Gernsbacher Bros . 5.00 

Goetz, Arthur S.. 5.00 

Goldgraber, Mrs. J. 5.00 

Gross, Leon 5.00 

Joseph, Sam. A... 5.00 

Keene, D. H 15.00 

Levine, H 5.00 

Levy, D 5.00 

Levy, Samuel .... 5.00 

Lowenthal, M. L. . 5.00 



'Life Member 
'*Deceased Life Member 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



6!/ 



Marx, Herman . . . 5.00 

Mayer, Mrs. Jac. 10.00 

Segal, Herman ... 5-oo 

Weltman, Mrs. L- s.eo 

Galveston 

Cohen, Robert I. . 5-eo 
The Hebrew Be- 
nevolent Society. 25.00 
*Ivasker, M. 
Lovenberg, 1., Jr.. 5.00 
Ullman, Julius L,. . S-oo 
Houston 

Kiam, Ed 25.00 

Midland 

Halff, Henry May- 
er I0.0<5 

Palestine 

Maier, S S-OO 

SViineoia 

Bromberg, I. G. .. 10.00 

San Antonio 

Berman, 10.00 

Blum, Mrs. Fannie 5.00 

Dalkowitz, Bros... 10.00 

Halff, Mrs. M. ... 25.00 

Halff, Mrs. S. . . . S-oo 

Holzmark, Mrs. T. 5.00 

Joske, Alex 10.00 

Lecture Fee, Dr. 

Jos. Krauskopf's iog.go 
Oppenheimer, Dan. 10.00 
Oppenheimer, Her- 
bert Mayer iS-oo 

Oppenheimer, Ju- 
lius 10. GO 

Oppenheijner, J. 

D. lo.oo 

Oppenl^eimer, Ml 

L 10.00 

Stiefel, Max S-oo 

Wolff, Jake 10.00 

Texarkana 

Heilbron, I. 5-oo 

Tyler 

Wadei; B 5-oo 

UTAH 

Salt Lake City 

Auerbach, Geo. S.. 10.00 

Baer, Adolph S-oo 

Cohn, Henry 5-oo 

Davis Shoe Co... 5-oo 
Jewish Relief So- 
ciety S-oo 

Kaufman, Leo . . . 5.00 

Lewinsohn, Jos. L. S-oo 

Rosenblatt, N. ... 10.00 

Sweet, Leon ..... S-oo 

*Life Member 
'•*Deceased Life Member 



VIRGINIA 
Harrisonburg 

Bloom, Bernard .. 5.00 
Oestreicher, S. ... i.oo 

Lynchburg 

Lazarus, L 5-eo 

Norfolk 

''Ladies' Hebrew 
Benevolent Asso. 

Hecht, Jacob s-oo 

HirscMer, E S-oo 

Spogat, J. W. .... 5.00 
Richmond 

Binswauger Harry 

S S-oo 

Binswanger, M. I. 5.00 
Galeski, Dr. S. .. 5.00 

Kaufman, 1 5.00 

Levy, Arthur .... 5.00 
*"MiUhiser, Mrs. Clarence 
Millhiser, Mrs. 

Clarence 5.00 

Millhiser, Emanuel 5.00 
*Millhiser Gustave 

Raab, E S-oo 

Wallerstein, Henry 

S 5.00 

Roanoke 

Sessler, Rabbi M. . 5.00 
Staunton 

Strauss, L. G. ... 5.0G 

WASHINGTON 
Chechaiis 

Kaufman, H. A... 10.00 

Everett 

Hochstadter, Bern- 
ard 5.00 

Seattle 

Aaronson, J 10.00 

Bernstein, Julius.. 10.00 

Boris, Fred 5.00 

Dellar, Jos 10.00 

Eckstein, Mrs. Na- 
than 30.00 

Frauenthal Bros., 

Inc 10.00 

Fried enthal, Sol... 10.00 

*GaIland, Bonham 

*Galland, Mrs. C. K. 

Goldie, Jos 5.00 

Gottstein, M. & K. 25.00 

*Gottstein, Meyer 

*Gottstein, Rebecca 
Guthman, Otto .. 10.00 

*Lang, Julius C, 
Loeb, Sam. S. .. 10.00 

Moyses, Ben 10.00 

Ostrow, Sam 5.00 



Reiter, Carl 5.00 

Schwabacher, Leo 

S 10.00 

Shemansld, A. ... 5.00 

Silver, Harry .... 10.00 

Tacoma 

Feist, Theo 5.00 

Ladies' MontefioTe 

Society 5.0-0 

WEST VIRGINIA 
Bluefieid 

Heller, Mrs. Flor- 
ence Simon .... 5.00 

Charleston 

Baer, Ben. ...... 5.00 

Frankenberger, 

Max 5.00 

Parkersburg 

Nathan, Mrs. Ben 5.00 

Wheeling 

Bloch, Sam'l S 5.00 

*Horkheimer, Mrs. B. 
Horkheimer, Mor- 
ris 25.00 

Isenberg, Israel . . 5.00 
Rice, Albert M. . . 5.00 

Rice, S. M 5.00 

Sonneborn, M. ... 5.00 

Wolf, Leo 5-00 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 

Hammel, Jacob . . 5.00 
Marshall, Louis J. 5.00 

Ashland 

Levy, Jas. 1 5-°° 

La Crosse 

Hirshheimer, A. .. 25.00 

Milwaukee 

Aarons, Lehman . . 5.00 
Cohen, Mrs. Ger- 
trude 5-00 

Heller, Simon .... 10.00 

Landauer, Max .. 10.00 

Miller, Morris 5.00 

Schuster, Chas. ... 3.00 

Schuster, Bertha.. 5.00 

Milwaukee Federated 
Jewish Charities 10.000 

ENGLAND 

London 

Meyers, Arthur . . 25.00 
* Meyers, Arthur 

SWITZERLAND 

Rorschach 

**Schoenfeld, Max 



68 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



ALABAMA 



Birmingham 

Birmingham lyodge 

No. 368 5.00 

Mobile 

Beth Zur Lodge 

No. 84 5.00 

Montgomery 

Alabama Lodge 

No. 299 5.00 

CALIFORNIA 

Oakland 

Oakland Lodge No. 

■25-2 5.00 

Sacramento 

Ltham Lodge, No. 

37 10.00 

CONNECTICUT 

New Haven 

Horeb Lodge No. 

^5 5.00 

COLORADO 
Colorado Springs 

Colorado Springs 

Lodge No. 523.. 5.00 
Denver 

Denver Lodge No. 

^71 10.00 

Trinidad 

Trinidad Lodge 

No. 293 5.00 

DELAWARE 
Wilmington 

Wilmington Lodge 

No. 470 5.00 

DISTRICT OF COLI- 

UIViBIA 
Washington 

Argo Lodge No. 

413 5.00 

GEORGIA 
Columbus 

Columbus Lodge 
No. yy 5.00 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Benevolent Orders 

Contributing Lodges 



Independent Order B'nai B rith 

Savannah 

Joseph Lodge No, 
76 



MINNESOTA 



5.00 



ILLINOIS 

Bloomington 

Abraham Lincoln 
No. 90 



Lincoln 

Liberty I^odge No. 
294 

Chicago 

Oriental Lodge No. 



Ramah Lodge No. 
33 

Springfield 

Ernes Lodge No. 
67 

INDIANA 
Fort Wayne 

Emek B e r a c h a 
Lodge No. 61 . 

IOWA 
Des Moines 

Des Moines Lodge 
No. 330 

KENTUCKY 



5- 00 



25.00 



Lexington 

Lexington 
No. 289 



Lodge 



LOUISIANA 
New Orleans 

District Grand 

Lodge No. 7 ... 150.00 
*District Grand Lodge 
No. 7 

MICHIGAN 

Kalamazoo 

Mishan Lodge No. 

247 5-00 



Minneapolis 

Minneapolis Lodge 

No. 271 15.00 



MISSISSIPPI 

Columbus 

Joseph Herz Lodge 

No. 181 

Natchez 

Ezra Lodge No. 
334 

MISSOURI 
St. Joseph 

Joseph Lodge No. 
73 

St. Louis 

Eben Ezra Lodge 
No. 47 

Missouri Lodge 
No. 22 

MONTANA 
Butte 

Baron De Hirsch 
Lodge No. 420. 

NEBRASKA 
Omaha 

Nebraska Lodge 
No. 354 

NEW MEXICO 
East Las Vegas 

J. E. Rosenwald 
Lodge No. 545. i 

NEW YORK 

Albany 

Gideon Lodge No. 
140 



5.00 



5.00 



New York City 

District Grand 

Lodge No. I . . 100.00 
Hebron Lodge No. 

S 5-00 

Henry Jones 

Lodge No. 79 . . 2.00 
Zion Lodge 

No. 2 10.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



69 



Plattsburg 

Joel Lodge No. 

ii8 5-00 

Rochester 

Zerubbabel Lodge 

No. 53 10.00 

OHIO 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati Lodge 

No. 4 10.00 

Cleveland 

Cleveland Lodge 
No. i6 10. oo 

Columbus 

*Zion Lodge No. 62 

Dayton 

Eschol Lodge No. 

55 10.00 

OREGON 
Portland 

Theodore Herzl 

Lodge No. 314. 10.00 
Portland Lodge 

No. 416 10.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allegheny 

Jericho Lodge No. 

44 S-oo 

Braddock 

Braddock Lodge 

No. 516 5.00 

Scranton 

Ainos Lodge No. 

136 S-oo 

TENNESSEE 
Memphis 

Memphis Lodge 

No. 35 10.00 

Nashville 

Maimonides Lodge 

No. 46 5.00 

TEXAS 

San Antonio 

Edar Lodge No. 

211 5.00 

Tyler 

Edward L a s k e r 
Lodge No. 347. 5.00 

UTAH 

Salt Lake City 

Peixotto Lodge 

No. 421 10.00 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



WASHINGTON 

Seattle 

Hildesheimer Lodge 

No. 503 5.00 

WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee 

Isaac Lodge No. 

87 5-00 

Gilead Lodge No. 

41 5-00 

Order B'rith Abraham 

CALIFORNIA 
Los Angeles 

Los Angeles Lodge 

No. 414 5.00 

CONNECTICUT 

South Norwalk 

South Norwalk 

Lodge No. 185.. 5.00 

ILLINOIS 

Chicago 

B'nai Ephraim 
Lodge No. 172.. 5.00 

INDIANA 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis Lodge 

No. 230 5.00 

KENTUCKY 

Louisville 

Falls City Lodge 
No. 358 5-00 

MINNESOTA 
Minneapolis 

Minneapolis City 

Lodge No. 63 . . 5.00 

NEW YORK 

Buffalo 

Niagara Lodge No. 

148 5.00 

Elmira 

Elmira City Lodge 

No. 272 3.00 

OHIO 

Youngstown 

B'ne Moses Lodge 

No. 209 5.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Pittsburgh 
Hope Lodge No. 

210 2.00 



RHODE ISLAND 
Providence 

Maccabee Lodge 
No. 176 10.00 

Roger Williams 
Lodge No. 359. 3.00 

Star of Rhode Is- 
land Lodge No. 
330 4-00 

TEXAS 

Dallas 

Alexander Kohut 

Lodge No. 247. 5.00 

Jacob Frees Lodge 

No. loi 5.00 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 

Seattle Lodge No. 

460 5.00 

Independent Order 
Free Sons of Israel 



NEW YORK 
New York City 

Mt. Vernon Lodge 

No. 71 5.00 

Standard Lodge 

No. 30 5.00 

Kingston 

Lebanon Lodge 

No. 55 5.00 

WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee 

Cream City Lodge 

No. 63 5.00 

Independent Order 
True Sisters 

CONNECTICUT 

New Haven 
Jochebed Lodge 

No. 4 5.00 

NEW YORK 

Albany 

Abigail Lodge No. 

3 10.00 



70 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



New York City 

Bathia Lodge No. 

10 5.00 

'Hadassah Lodge 

No. 8 5.00 

New York Lodge 

No. 15 10.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Philadelphia 

B'nath Jeshurun 

Lodge No. 2 10.00 

Independent Western 

Star Order 

ILLINOIS 
Chicago 

Grand Lodge .... 100.00 
MICHIGAN 

Detroit 

Detroit Lodge No. 

118 10.00 

OHIO 
Steubenville 

Jehuda, Hamachby 

Lodge No. 131 5.00 

Youngstown 

Youngstown Lodge 

No. 136 5.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Philadelphia 

Germantown Lodge 

No. 218 5.00 

Independent Order 
B'rith Sholom 
CONNECTICUT 
Hartford 

Hartford Progres- 
sive Lodge No. 
162 5.00 

DELAWARE 

Wilmington 

Delaware Lodge 
No. 141 5.00 

OHIO 
Youngstown 

Federal Lodge No. 

170 10.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Philadelphia 

Philip Saeta Lodge 

No. 73 3-00 

"Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Wilkes-Barre 

Diamond City Lodge 

No. 135 5-00 

Independent Order 
B'rith Abraham 

COLORADO 

Denver 

Pride of Denver 

Lodge No. 333- • S-oo 

CONNECTICUT 

New Haven 

Columbus Lodge 

No. 61 5.00 

INDIANA 

Indianapolis 
Zion Lodge No. 

221 10.00 

MISSOURI 

Kansas City 

Star of Kansas 
City Lodge No. 

424 S-oo 

St. Louis 

Nathan Frank Lodge 
No. 87 5.00 

Charles Werner 

Lodge No. 114.. 5.00 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 
Manchester 

Granite State Lodge 

No. 181 5.00 

NEW JERSEY 
Perth Amboy 

United Hebrew 

Lodge No. 502.. 5.00 

NEW YORK 

Brooklyn 

Moses Mendelsohn 
Lodge No. 91 .... 5.00 
Pride of Brooklyn 

Lodge No. 467 . 10.00 
Elmira 
Berger Lodge No. 

388 3-00 

Rochester 
Alfred Dreyfus 

Lodge No. 201. 10.00 



Syracuse 

Samuel Lodge No. 

241 5.00 

Utica 

Roscoe Conkling 

Lodge No. 364.. 2.00 

OHIO 

Cleveland 

Gotthold Ephriam 
Lessing Lodge 
No. 37 s-oo 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Homestead 

Homestead Lodge 

No. 437 5.00 

Philadelphia 

Dr. Theodore Herzl 

No. 183 5.00 

Jezerzane Lodge 

No. 405 5.00 

Dr. Joseph Kraus- 

kopf Lodge No. 

400 5.00 

South Bethlehem 

South Bethlehem 
Lodge No. 324-- S-oo 

RHODE ISLAND 

Providence 

Hope of Rhode Is- 
land Lodge No. 
549 3-00 

Pride of Rhode Is- 
land Lodge No. 
510 s.oo 

South Providence 
Lodge No. 238.. 5.00 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Chattanooga Lodge 

No. 449 5.00 

TEXAS 

Galveston 

Galveston Lodge 

No. 461 ' 2.00 

VIRGINIA 

Newport News 

Virginia Lodge 

No. 195 5.00 



Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, D. D.. 'PresiJenl I. H. Silverman, Treasurer 

4713 Pulaski Avenue, Philadelphia 605 Land Title Building, Philadelphia 

Abraham H. Fromenson, Execulioe Secretary 
407 Mutual Life Building, Philadelphia 



nocmbcrebip of ^bc IRattonal ifarm Scbool 

I, the undersigned, being in sympathy with the object of "The 
National Farm School" — the training of lads in the practice and 
science of agriculture, for agricultural callings — do hereby agree to 
subscribe as one of the Alaintainers of the institution, the dues of 
a Life Member ($100.00) Patron ($25.00) Supporter ($5.00) 
Friend ($50.00) AIember ($10.00) 

Name 

Address •. 

Date 



NOTE — UnJerscore the class of membership you wish to join. Life Membership calls for but one 
(the first) payment. Make check payable to THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 



Iform of XeoaQ to ITbe flattonal jfarm Scbool 

"I give and bequeath unto The National Farm School, Bucks 

Co., Pa., near Doylestozvn, the sum of dollars, 

free from all taxes, to he paid to the Treasurer, for time being, 
for the use of the institution." 



Iform of '2)e\>i0e 

OF REAL ESTATE OR GROUND RENT 

"I give and devise unto The National Farm School, Bucks 
Co., Pa., near Doylestown, {here describe the property or ground 
rent), together with the appurtenances in fee simple, and all policies 
of insurance covering said premises, whether fire, title or otherwise 
free from all taxes." - _ 



UST as improved farm im- 
plements make for the 

prosperity and the comfort of the farmer, 
so do improved lighting and cooking ap- 
pliances advance city dv/ellers. 

The All-Gas Kitchen, where cooking 
is done and water is heated only by Gas 
insures the best result with the least 
effort at the least cost. There are very 
many in use in Philadelphia, where 
"U. G. I. Service" is a guarantee of satis- 
faction to the consumer. 



THE UNITED GAS IMPROVEMENT 
COMPANY 



AND PEAKL3 

For me^gnitude ^ud nchRc^j \h\j 

Collection of DidOTzoTzd^, Peej^h 

Q^izd other Gemj 

jurpexjjej avEy previous effortJ 
of \\i\s houje 

Th.e DeLSigi? exrzd 

Crexft^rrzan^hip of the 

MouRtingj' evre nzo^l beexuULil 

Bailey BM[i5fi{BiDDLE(Q 

Chejtizut Jtreet, Philexd.dphi5 





®Ij^ (Knlnmal 

MARKET AT THIRTEENTH 

IS LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE 
BUSINESS & SHOPPING DISTRICTS 
OF PHILADELPHIA :-: :-: 

Harvey L. Elkins, Pre;iident 

I. H. Davidson, Jr., Asst. Treasurer 

Thomas Mclihenny, Sec'y & Treasure;' 



BANKING 

2 % Interest allowed on 
active accounts, 3% Inter- 
est allowed on savingfund 
accounts. 

REAL ESTATE 

Rents and incomes collect- 
ed, mortgages bought and 
sold, conveyancing. 

TRUST 

Acts as trustee, executor, 
guardian and administra- 
tor. Wilis prepared with- 
out charge. 

SAFE DEPOSIT 

Vaults at street level indi- 
vidual boxes — private re- 
tiring rooms. 







THB MAJESTIC HOTFI broad st. & girard ave . 

The Heart Centre of Philadelphia 

Has no Superior in This Country or Europe in 

Construction, Equipment, Cuisine or Service 
BERE SEGAL, General ^lanager. 

As Philadelphia Leads the World So 

Ibarbwick Si HDagee Company 

Lead Philadelphia in the Manufacture of 

1Rug6 m\b Carpets 

The high standard of our well-known weaves 
has been uniformly maintained for years and 
today we enjoy the confidence and respect 
of the best houses throughout the country 
FORTY SIZES OF RUGS IN STOCK 

Special Sizes IVlade to Order 

Hardwick & Magee Company 

Successors to Ivlns, Dietz & Magee 
Retailers of All Standard Floor Coverings 

1220-1222 MARKET STREET 






^y^ABLE AS IRON 



SERVIGE ! t 




F. C.DicKey Co. 

LigKtiAg FixtMres 
17 Z7 CKestiwrt 5^^^^! 
PKiladelphia 



We especially call your attention to our new Fall line of Silk 



Shades and Portables for the Holidays 



JOSEPH S. KEEN, Jr., Pres't & Gcn'l M'g'r 

GEORGE M. BUNTING, Vice-Pres't & Treas. 

H. BAYARD HODGE, Sec'y & Ass't Treas. 

WM. H. ROTH, Assistant Secretary 

American Pipe and Construction Co. 

ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 

112 North Broad Street Philadelphia 

J. W. IvEDOUX, AM. SOC. C. E. JAMES H. DAWES 

Chief Engineer Gen'l Sup't Construction Dep't 

HAROLD PEROT KEEN, Gen'l Sup't Operating Dep't 



Zbc IDulcanite Ipaving Company 

LAND TITLE BUILDING PHILADELPHIA 

General Contractors for Reinforced Concrete Construction, Aspliait, Mastic 

Water-proofing, Insulation, Belgian Block 
Asphalt Block and Vitrified Brick Paving 

Asphalt, Mastic and Cement Floors our Specialty 



DISINFECTANTS AND DISINFECTING APPLIANCES 

HOUSES SCIENTIFICALLY FUMIGATED 

WE ARE EXPERTS IN THE LINE 

West Disinfecting Company, Inc. 

THE LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF DISINFECTANTS AND DISIN- 
FECTING APPLIANCES IN AMERICA 

MAIN OFFICE AND LABORATORY, NEW YORK 
PHILADELPHIA OFFICE, 1303 RACE ST. 

Charles Auerbach, Mgr. Both Phones 



Sanitary Plumbing Fixtures At Moderate Prices 

Steam and Hot Water Heating Materials 
"PRECISE HEAT" REDUCES THE COAL BILL 

Haynes- Thompson Company 

2107-09 VINE STREET PHILADELPHIA 



?» 



-^ 



ROT ^. mmmm 

KE/^L EST/^TE 
IIJO© hmt TITLE laDLBMQ 



J. Walter Rosenberg 

Broad & Walnut Streets 

PHILADELPHIA 



Qo/T\pli/n(^9ts of 



/T\. |1ab^r 9 ?o. 



MASTBAUM BROS. & FLEISHER 

REAL ESTATE 
1328 South Penn Square 



^ 



—4 




purs of tl?<^ Bett<?r Qrade 



Jl^eo p. 5'?f?'"^ 

1426 U/alput J^''^^^ 



J. E. CALDWELL & CO. 

-^ JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS jZ?^ 

IMPORTERS OF 

Diamonds, Pearls and Precious Stones, Fine Watches and 
Clocks, and European Objects of Decorative Art 

^^^^ 

Sterling Silver for Wedding Anniversaries 

902 CHESTNUT STREET PHILADELPHIA 



Vm ^\. Sam? 



WALNUT AT THIRTEENTH 
PHILADELPHIA 



EUGENE G. MILLER, manager. 



Compliments of 




HOSKINS 



904-906 

CHESTNUT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



Printing Office Furniture 

Engraving Filing Devices 

Stationery Cutlery 

Blank BooJ^s Kodal^s 

Loose Leaf Devices Leather Goods 

^ Largeil and mo^ Complete Stock in Philadelphia 
^ Fadlory and Printery on the Premises 



COMMERCIAL STATIONERS 
and OFFICE OUTFITTERS 



D 



g DIXON'S AN.GlO-SAXON.No.2-No.l802 



You CAN get in 

"DIXON'S ANGLO-SAXON" 

seven inches of pencil perfection. Are YOU getting it? 

JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO. 

Philadelphia Branch, 1020 Arch St. Main Office, Jersey City, N. J. 



STETSON HATS 

STETSON STORE 

1108 CHESTNUT ST. 



MacDonald & Campbell 



Men's and Young Men's Suits and 

Overcoats $15, $18, $20 up to $50 

Ready-to-wear garments of the unusual 
merit you expect from us, specially made to 
meet the requirements of our ci'itical patron- 
age, but as low in price as Suits and Over- 
coats which cannot claim their distinction. 

Hundreds of models, shades, colorings and 
patterns that are exclusive to us and strik- 
ingly emphasize our reputation as the Fashion 
center for Men's clothing. 

N. B. — For a long time we have extended to 
our friends and customers the courtesy of 
free local telephone calls. 

We want all to know it: that they may 
come in the store and use any one of the 
eighteen stations for local calls absolutely 
free of charge without feeling under any 
obligation. 

1334-1336 CHESTNUT STREET 

Store Closes 5.30 



IMPORTER 
^HATS GOWNS 
CORSETS FURS 
TAILORED 
SUITS 
Your Inspection Is Invited 

1732 CHESTNUT STREET 




THEATRE 
TICKET OFFICES 

The Bellevue-Stratford 



BOTH TELEPHONES 

THE ANTIQUE SHOPS OF 
J. M. WINTROB 

918-926 PINE STREET 

Philadelphia 
Rare Old Pieces, Oddities 

Skillfully Reproduced 



French Plumes and Feather 

Fancies made from your old 
OSTRICH FEATHERS 

Dyeing, Cleaning and Curling 

MAILHOT 

1510 CHESTNUT STREET 
Mail orders given prompt attention 

?eathers curled on your hat while you 
wait. 



Old 

r^ ,■ m m Floors 

"-'" I ¥ ¥ I ^""^^ . 

^^""^^ H ardwood |B-"''f">l 




GOOD 




r loors 



Parquetry, Wood 
Carpet and Grilles 
1 706 Chestnut St. 



pbtlaMpbta 

nnanufacturers fiDutual 

jftre Uneurance Co, 

ARCADE BUILDING 
Philadelphia 
EDWIN I. ATLEE, President 



PRINTERS 

and 

Compilers of Trade Lists 



1)owe Hddrcsslnd Company 



208-210 



FOURTH STREET 



ASA W. VANDERGRIFT, Pres. 
F. W. HUDTWALCKER, Sec.-Treas 

SHEIP & VANDERGRIFT 

Incorporated 
MANUFACTURERS OF CIGAR 
BOXES— LOCK-CORNER BOXES 

Nos. 814 to 832 Lawrence St. 
Philadelphia 



J. BRECHT'S SONS 

CIGAR BOX MANUFACTURERS 
109 and 111 N. Orianna Street 
Telephone 



ffl. J. DALTON CO, 

CIGAR IMPORTERS 

Philadelphia 



THE MANUFACTURERS 
NATIONAL BANK 



CAPITAL, $500,000 
Surplus and Undivided Profits 
$423,911.94 
\A/illiam H. Heisler, President 

Samuel Campbell, Cashier 
Your Business solicited and will be 
well cared for 



IGNATIUS HAAZ & BRO. 

Manufacturers of 

SAMPLE CARDS, SAMPLE 
BOOKS 



^[anufacturers of all kinds of 
Hard Rubber, Elastic aiu/ Lcalher-Co7'cred 

TRUSSES 

Sole Makers of the Celebrated 

DR. McINTOSn NATURAL UTERINE) 

SUPPORTER 

For Home and Export Trade 

— Abrlominal and Uterine Supporters — 

Shoulder P,races, Crutches. Elastic Hosiery 

and ISodv P.elts 

912 WALNUT ST., Phila., U. S. A. 



LINSK & BASS 

Manufacturers oi 

CHILDREN'S & JUNIORS' 

DRESSES 



404-412 Brown Street 


919-921 Walnut Street 


Philadelphia 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


RELIABLE LADIES' 


David Weber Theo. Greenwald 
DAVID WEBER & CO. 


TAILORING COMPANY 


PAPER BOX MAKERS 
Corrugated Paper 

Corrugated Bottle Wrappers . . 


905 MARKET STREET 


Corrugated Shipping Cases 
Folding Boxes, Bottle Boxes and 


1021 CHESTNUT STREET 


Metal Edge Boxes 
N. W. Cor. Fifth and Locust Sts. 



Factory, Burlington, Icwa 

MISSISSIPPI PEARL 
BUTTON COMPANY 

Salesroom, 1017 ARCH STREET 
Philadelphia 

P. LAUBER 



31. frPBH $: BcnB 

Wholesale and Retail Jewelers 
and Expert Diamond Cutters 

WE offer you the services of 
the most expert diamond 
cutting department in the 
country. We remove flaws from 
diamonds, transform old-fashion- 
ed square diamonds into brilliant 
round stones, make dull dia- 
monds brilliant, etc. 

N. W. COR. 8th AND CHESTNUT 

Open Evenings 



SACKS BROS. 



1228 Cherry Street 



SEEDS 



THE BEST 



PLANTS 



BULBS 

Catalogues mailed free 

Henry A. Dreer 

714 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



This Slipper 
in Cloth of 
Gold or Silver 




Bridal Gifts Handsome Pictures 
Artistic Framing of Pictures 



Many Other Designs in 
GOLD & SILVER SLIPPERS 

built by the cleverest slipper mak 
designs, ideas and suggestions of 
ers in the world and following the 
Mr. Geuting. Our great stock in- 
cludes slippers of all descriptions 
from the plain styles at $3, to the 
most elaborate at $10 and $12. 
Special Pure Sill< Stockings, to 
match any Gown, from 95c to $4 

GEUTING'S 

(Pronounced Gyting) 
1230 Market St., Philadelphia 





Compliments of 

ROSE MFG. CO. 

Philadelphia 



OTTO SCHEIBAL, 
Art Shop 20 N. Ninth St. 



ASHER'S 

S. E. Cor. 22nd & Walnut Sts. 

BALLROOM, BANQUET & 

RECEPTION ROOMS 

Especially adapted for 
weddings; large plat- 
form and pulpit; spe- 
cial room for brides. 
Write for open dates 
or call. Phone, Lo- 
cut 3077 

Swimming School Open all 

Year 



» THE NEW >^ HOTEL HANOVER 

CLAUDE IVI. MOHR, Manager 

ARCH AND TWELFTH STREETS 

Philadelphia 

NEWLY FURNISHED THROUGHOUT MUSIC IN CAFE 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

Rooms, without bath, $1.00 per day and up. 

Rooms with bath, $1.50 per day and up. 
Running Hot and Cold Water and Telephone in Every Room 

Table d'Hote Dinner, 50 Cents, 12 to 8 P. M. 
Special Business Men's Lunch, 12 to 2 P. M. 35 Cents. 
Cuisine and Service Unexcelled. 



Keystone— Race 6471 D Bell— Walnut 407 

Race 1681 

B. STAHL 

FLOWERS AND DECORATIONS 

Eleventh Street above Chestnut Philadelphia 

Special Attention Given to All Mail and Phone Orders 

The Belber Trunk and Bag Company 

Manufacturers of 

Trunks, Dress Suit Cases, Telescopes, Bags and Leather Goods 

COLUMBIA AVENUE, MASCHER, TURNER 

AND HANCOCK STREETS :-: :-: 

Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 

OFFICE, 1641 HANCOCK STREET 



HOBDELL 

Practical Dyer of 

OS'TXICH FEcATHEliS 

We Solicit Your Feather Wants in all its Branches 
DYEING, CLEANING AND CURLING 

154-156 North 13th Street 



p. &t r. CORBIN 



DIVISION 



American Hardware Corporation 




LOCKS, KNOBS AND 
ESCUTCHEONS 

Suitable for all kinds of Buildings 
Over 150 Designs from which 
to select 



The Name is a Guarantee of 
QuaHty 



DISPLAY ROOMS, New York City Philadelphia Chicago 
Works and Main Offices, New Britain, Conn. 



McNICHOL 



Paving and Con^mdion Company 



General Contractors 



BETZ BUILDING 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



B. HOOLEY & SON 



435-439 NORTH BROAD STREET 

Philadelphia 



KEYSTONE, MAIN 390 —TELEPHONES— BELL, MARKET 409 

National Aniline & Chemical Co. 

—ANILINE COLORS, DYE STUFFS, CHEMICALS— 
log North Water Street Philadelphia 

Agent for Schoellkopf, Hartford & Hanna Co. A. Lee Company 



Haron Black 



Z. IM. Sparhs 

121 milalnut Street 



lalltttg^r $c Parrot 

1211 Hvcb Street 



NEW YORK, 345, 347 Broadway 



BOSTON, 67 Chauncy Street 



CHICAGO, 605 Medinah Temple 

CatUn Si Company 

YARNS 

128-130 CHESTNUT STREET PHILADELPHIA 

COPS, SKEINS, CONES, TUBES AND WARPS 



Established 1883 Both Phones 

Merchants Parcel Delivery 

STEWART & GRAHAM, Props. 

Packages Delivered to All Parts of the City at 
Lowest Rates. Special Arrangements made with 
Business Houses of Other Cities for Delivery of 
Packages in Philadelphia and Camden 

1010-1014 RACE STREET PHILADELPHIA 

HULTON DYEING & FINISHING COMPANY 

(Incorporated) 

2712 JASPER STREET 

Philadelphia 
DYERS OF 

FAST COLORS, WOOLEN AND WORSTED YARNS AND SLUBBING 
IN THE BALL 

FINISHERS OF 

WOOLEN AND WORSTED PIECE GOODS, MEN'S WEAR FABRICS, 
DRESS GOODS, ETC., ETC. 

N. CRAMER & SONS 

Manufacturers of 

Cloaks and Suits 

1427 VINE STREET 

Philadelphia 

3Firtb S. jfoster Company 

DYERS AND FINISHERS OF PIECE GOODS 

We are specially equipped for Fine All-AVool and Silk and Wool 

Mixed Fabrics 

"BRIGHT COLORS— SUPERB LUSTRE" 



THIS REPORT IS PRINTED BY 



Olaljan printing Olompany 



218 SOUTH FOURTH ST. : : PHILADELPHIA 



THE JEWISH EXPONENT 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS of the JEWISH PEOPLE 
Representative of Jewish Institutions 
and Welcomed in the Jewish Home 

— Published Every Friday — 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, $3.00 PBR ANNUM . 

Philadelphia Office, 608 CHESTNUT ST. 

Baltimore Office, 120 AISQUITH ST. 



Win. Steele & Sons 
Company 



R. E. W. W. 



THe JoHn Ma'wson 
HAIR CLOTH COMPANY 

Kensington Avenue Glenwood Avenue Venango Street 

Let Me Estimate on Your Work 

A. P. Fraim 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER 

Office and Shop, 319 Market Street 

JOBBING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO 

Bell Phone Estimates Furnished Keystone Phone 



•'^^ ;^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ :^j^^^ •'^ '^^^ •'^ '"^^ •'"^ •'^ '"^^ '^ 

'^j^'^:^*<£?"^£5' •^?^'<£^--S:^ •-i5=".£:7'<i57 •^:5"^?7-<i^ •^5="^i?^'^C?' ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



xt^ 


^ 


/ ^^^'^'^ 


~m\ 




\ 


\mW '--^y 


w 


\^ ■'■'.■■-,.-: 


1 1/ 


Klosfit are made with 


"V" shape 


elastic 


gusset over 


each hip 



I KLOSFIT PETTICOAT I 



Needs No Alteration 

Thousands of Well Dressed 

Women are Wearing the 

"KLOSFIT" Petticoat 



\ because it is the most perfect httmg petticoat ever devised and real 
\ petticoat comfort was never realized until the coming of the ''Klosfit" 

!i To the woman who desires to be well-gowned the 

^ Klosfit is an absolute necessity. 

^ SOLD BY ALL DEALERS 

\.' "=^- '^i^-'^^'^^- '^^^'^i.'^^' ''^•^i.''^^' ^=55v''"^-'^5.'^5^'^^^''=^' ^^^^?^^V^^ 

THE INTEGRITY TITLE INSURANCE 

TRUST AND SAFE DEPOSIT CO. 
S. W. Cor. 4th & Green Sts., Philadelphia 

Capital Stock, Full Paid, $500,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, 1,124,665.82 

Deposits 4,069,704.13 

BANKING DEPARTMENT 

Receives money on deposit, subject to check 
on sight, allowing 2 per cent, interest. Rents 
boxes for safe keeping of valuables in burglar 
and fire-proof vaults, for $3.00 and upwards. 
Letters of Credit and International Checques 
for Travelers issued, available everywhere. 

SAVING FUND DEPARTMENT 

Open from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

IVIonday to 7 P. M. Saturday to 1 P. M. 

3 per cent, interest allowed on deposits 

TITLE AND REAL ESTATE DEPARTIVIENT 

Examines and insvires titles to real estate. Collects rents, dividends, interest, etc. 
Money loaned on mortgage and mortgages for sale. Attends to all details pertaining to 
buying, selling and conveying of real estate. 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 

Transacts all Trust Company business and acts in the capacity of executor, adminis- 
trator, guardian or Trustee taking entire charge of estates. All valuables received for safe 
keeping. Wills receipted and kept in safe boxes without charge. 




OFFICERS 

President 
GEORGE KESSLER 

First J'ice-President 
PHILIP SPAETER 

Second Vice-President 
PHILIP DOERR 
Secretary and Treasurer 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



George Kessler Fred'k Gaeckler 

Philip Doerr George Nass 

Frederick Orlemann C. J. Preisendanz 
Charles G. Berlinger Daniel W. Grafly 

Philip Spaeter J. Edwin Rech 

Wm. H. Rook-stool A. P. Kunzig 

Albert Hellwig A. F. Schoenhut 

HERMAN WISCHMANjohn Greenwood Chas. W. ^^liller 

PHiLiP^E.'^ GUCKES 2)te Mcamtcn eprecben Deutscb 



Wm. G. Berlinger 
Chas. Strickler 
Jacob Kramer 
i. P. Strittmatter, 

M.D. 
J. McGlynn 
Jos. MedicHS 
Gustav A. Kirchner 




^ BOILEPS ^ 

FOR HEATING BY STEAM, 
HOT WATER AND VAPOR 

The H. B. SMITH Company 

1225 ARCH STREET 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Mills Water Tiihe Boiler 



JosepK Call 

[painter anb 2)ecorater 

1727 N. Tenth Street 

Brick Fronts a Specialty 



Both Phones 



George L. Sipps 

CARPENTER, BUILDER AND CONTRACTOR 
912 LOCUST STREET 

Nnrtli f ?n« lattk 

Twenty-ninth and Dauphin Streets 
Capita'! $50,000.00 Surplus $10,000.00 

2 per cent Interest on Check Accounts 

3>'2 per cent Interest on Savings Fund Accounts 

Open Monday and Friday Evening until 9 P. M. 

Louis H. Michel, President Joseph Schlenz, Vice President 

R. T. Moyer Cashier William Spratt, Vice President 



Charles I. Kent, Pres. William h. Guenther, Vice Pres. Leon Rosenbaum, Treas. & Sec. 

J. JACOB SHANNON & CO. 

^ YA L E ) ^'"' ^'"®' Railroad, Builders' |pL 1744 
HARDWARE Hardware and Equipment 



J ^ J MARKET STREET i 

and Contractors bupplies, » philada. 

^SHANNON&CQJ 
SUPPLIES i 



1744 Market Street I744 

GOLD SEAL BEER 



BREWED BY THE 



Continental Brewing: Co. 

MADE FROM THE VERY FINEST 
QUALITY OF MALT, AND .THE 
BEST GROWTHS OF HOPS 



BREWERY 



21st Street and Washington Avenue 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

BUICK flfiriOUflCEIVlEflT 

1913 MODEliS 

.^ Prices from $950 to $1,650 J0 
235 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



BEYOND COMPETITION 

BAILEY'S PURE RYE 

For the Use of Gentlemen who can Ap- 
preciate a Perfed Flavor and Aroma 
Combined with all the Requisites 
Necessary to Assi^ Convalescents When 
Recommended by a Physician. Fully 
Matured and Bottled. 



HUEY & CHRIST 



1308 ARCH STREET 



PHILADLEPHIA 



THE TENTH NATIONAL BANK 

OF PHILADELPHIA 

BROAD ST., SOUTH OP COLUMBIA AVE. {NEW BANK BLDG.) 

Established Dec. 14th, 1885 

Capital $200,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 135,228.66 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 

Dividends Paid to Date (Nov. 1912) 272,000.00 



SAMUEL B. MacDOWELL & SON 



BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 



1927 MONTGOMERY AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA 



The GLASS & NAGHOD BREWING GO, 

SOLITAIRE BEER IS GOOD 

Bottling Beer a Specialty 

1720-38 MBRVINB STREET PHILADELPHIA 



Columbia Avenue Trust Company 

Broad and Columbia Ave. 

Capital Paid in $400,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (Earned) $470,000.00 

Patronage Solicited 

SYL. A. IvEITH, President WM. AIvI^KN, Vice President 

WjNI. a. CARI^ILE, Secretary and Treasurer 

WHEN DISSATISFIED WITH 
YOUR WORK TRY 

FORREST LAUNDRY 

1221-23-25 COLUMBIA AVENUE 
Lace Curtains, Floor Linens a Specialty 
BOTH PHONES 



Phone Connections 



Established 1849 



CARL WILDE 

Importer of 

EMMENTHALER KASE, FOREIGN CHEESE AND 

DELICATESSEN 

357 North Second Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE "WRIGHT" GAS IRON 










Manufttcturecl by 



OSWALD LI¥I^ OOei Imm^ 

FRONT STREET AND LEHIGH AVENUE. PHILA. 



Emanuel Asher 

1602 DIAMOND STREET, PHILADELPHIA 

Bell Phone, Dianxond 898 
Keystone Phone, Park 979 



The entire building, 1602 Diamond 
Street, is now devoted to the busi- 
• ness, and is at the disposal of our 
patrons for the care and burial of 
their dead. Funerals can be held at 
the parlor at any time. 

ATLANTIC CITY, 22 N. DELAWARE AVENUE 
Atlantic Coast Phone— 222 

RESIDENCE, 1814 ERIE AVENUE 
Bell Phone, Tioga 7663 



Bell, Poplar 896 TELEPHONES Keystone, Park 67-71 

Bell, Poplar 897 
Bell, Poplar 3369 A 

NEVER CLOSED 

Haag Stable Company 

Limited 

SIXTEENTH STREET, BELOW DIAMOND 

Philadelphia 

UP-TO-DATE EQUIPAGES 

OPERA BUSSES BRIDAL COACHES VICTORIAS 

CABRIOLETTE HANSOMS BROUGHAMS CUT UNDERS 

COACHMEN IN FULL LIVERY 

ESTABLISHED 1855 

TKomas DelaKunty 

i 





Marble 


Granite 


WorKs 





Underground Vaults and 
Mausoleums a Specialty 

3811 to 3821 Ridge Ave. 

Opposite 
North Laurel Hill Cemetery PHILADELPHIA 



EXECUTES TRUST PAYS INTEREST ON DEPOSIT INSURES TITLES 

lurkfi (Knutttg Sruat (Enmpany 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $250,000 PAID IN CAPITAL, $125,000 

SURPLUS, $170,000 
Hugh B- Eastburn George Watson John S. Williams 

President and Trust Officer Assistant Trust Officer Vice President 

T. O. Atkinson Geo. H. Miller 

Treasurer Assistant Treasurer 

COURT AND BROAD STREETS DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Plumbing,' Steam, Hot Water and Warm 

Air Heater work. General Repairing 

and Machine Shop. 

Both Phones Doylestown, Pa. 

MICHAEL A. RUFE 

Formerly of Rufe Bros. 

New Location Taylor St., between 

Main and Pine Sts. 



Bell Phone 184A 

EMIL PEITER 

Bakery and Confectionery 

Pure Ice Cream 

Opp. Masonic Hall, Doylestown, Pa. 



H. B. ROSENBERGER 
Coal, Lime, Cement, Hay 

W. ASHLAND STREET 
Doylestown, Pa. 



Foseph Windholz Thomas F. Courtney 

Bell Phone, 176W Bell Phone 198W 
WINDHOLZ & COURTNEY 

Painters and Paperhangers, Wall 
Paper, Paints, Oils, Glass, Etc. 
Shop in Basement of Stuckert 
Building, MAIN STREET 

Estimates Given Doylestown, Pa. 



HENRY S. BEIDLER 
Doylestown, Pa. 
COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, 
CLOVER SEED, TIMOTHY AND 
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, 
FERTILIZERS, LIME, ETC. 



R. L. CLYMER 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

36, 38 and 40 WEST STATES ST. 

Doylestown, Pa. 



JOHN DONNELLY 

Dealer in Stoves, Heaters, 
Ranges, Tinware, Plumbing, 
Steam and Hot Water Heating 
Tin Roofing and Spouting 

Cor. Main St. and Oakland Ave. 



"GET IT AT PEARCE'S AND 

IT WILL BE RIGHT" 

SAMUEL R. PEARCE 

PHARMACIST 
HART BUILDING, Doylestown, Pa. 



Bell Telephone 

M. PEARLMAN 

LADIES' AND GENTS TAILOR 
Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

of Ladies' and Gents' Garments 
Cor. Main Street and Oakland Ave. 
Doylestown, Pa. 



C. S. WETHERILL 

COAL, LUMBER & MILL WORK 

143 WEST STATE STREET 
and 
242 WEST ASHLAND 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



STATE CHARTER. 1834 NATIONAL CHARTER, 1864 

The Doylestown National Bank 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 
Capital, $ 105,000.00 

Surplus, .... $ 105,000.00 

Undivided Profits, $ 145,000.00 

Deposits, ^112,0000.00 

John M. Jacobs, President. John N. Jacobs, Cashier. 



$ 250,000 00 



JAMES BARRETT 

Dealer in 
Paints and Oils, Cement, Terra 
Cotta Pipe, Horse Clothing and 
Full Line of Hardware, Etc. 
Cor. Main & Ashland, Doylestown 



Phone 279 X 

Berkowits Bros. 

TAILORS, CLOTHIERS 

AND FURRIERS 
Tailors for Men and NA/omen 
28 SOUTH MAIN STREET 

Doylestown, Pa. 



M. OFFEN 



1314 ARCH STREET 



Bell and Keystone Telephones 

Rate, $1.50 Per Day 

CLEAR SPRING HOTEL 

HIRAM SHISLER 

Proprietor 
246 N. Main St. Doylestown, Pa. 



J. G. GRIEB & SONS 

Wholesale 

SHOES AND RUBBERS 

531 Market St. Philadelphia 



WM. P. ELY & SON 

Dealer in 

Ready-to-Wear Clothing for Men, 

Boys, Children; Gent's Furnishing 

Goods, Hats, Caps, Boots & Shoes 

OPPOSITE P. & R. DEPOT 

DOYLESTOWN 



W. H. SWARTLEY 

Manufacturer of 

CIDER AND VINEGAR 

Cor State and West St. 

P. O. Box 412, DOYLESTOWN, Pa. 



Compliments of 



D. ATLAS 



Q r Durham Duplex Razors 
. J -^ sell usually for $5.00. For 
a short time we will sell their de- 
monstrating safely razors for 35c. 
By mail, 40. Biggest Value ever 
offered in Razors. 
Randall's Hardware Dept. Store 
Doylestown, Pa. 



Compliments 



ROSENBLUTH & GROSS 



B. Devitt D. R. Worman 

442 Bourse, Philadelphia 

Dealers in Grain and Feed 

Agents for Gluten, Peanut Cake, 
Dried Brewers Grains and Buclv- 
wheat and Rye Flour, etc. 



Founded 1850 

FINNEY & SON 

GRANITE AND MARBLE 
MONUMENTS 

529 & 531 NORTH TWELFTH ST. 

Above Ridge Ave. Philadelphia 

Hebrew Lettering a Specialty 

CHARLES GROSS 

Pasteurized 
MILK AND CREAM 

2123 WESTMORELAND STREET 
Philadelphia 

Both Phones 
JOHN HAAG COMPANY 

EGGS, BUTTER AND POULTRY 

Reading Terminal Market 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bell Phone, Filbert 29-49 

Keystone Phone, Race 253 

H. D. REESE 

Dealer in the Finest Quality of 

BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON, LAMB 

AND SMOKED MEATS 

1203 FILBERT STREET 

Philadelphia 



Both Phones 

Let Us Estimate on Anything 

EDWARD FAY & SON 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

1521 Ranstead Street 
Hoth above Chestnut j Phila. 



Compliments of 



WILKINSON BROS. & CO., Inc. 



CHRISTIAN PFAFF 
Wholesale Wine and Liquor 

Dealer 

Southeast Corner 

Passyunk Ave. and Catherine Sts. 

PHILADELPHIA 



J. E. FITZGERALD 



Both Phones 

J. H. WOHLFELD 

PLUMBER 

S. E. Cor. Seventh &. Jefferson Sts. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Kline & Ward's Character Wall 
Papers 

are very essential to a "tasty" 
home, as much depends upon the 
character of a paper in producing 
a tasty home. Our new fabric ef- 
fect wall papers have a character 
that reflects peace and harmony 
on the entire interior. We know 
you will be pleased when you see 
them, they are so full of real merit 
Kline & Ward, 711 N. Broad Street 



The-Man-on-the-Spot 
Everything in Real Estate 
Charles W. Rueter 

Main Office 

1703 TIOGA STREET 

Germantown Office 

MAIN AND CHELTEN AVENUE 



CERTIFIED MILK 

Wills-Jones-McEwen Co. 

Milk and Cream in Quanties 
Twenty-sixth below Oxford 
Montgomery Ave., West of 12th St. 

Block 6600 Germantown Ave. 

Philadelphia 



Bell Phone, Tioga 2.566 

E. P. RICHLY 

CONTRACTOR PLUMBING AND 
HEATING 
3860 North Sixteenth Street 
Registered 



WM. R. DOUGHERTY 

CARPENTER & BUILDER 
1608-1610 Sansom St. 
Philadelphia 
Jobbing Work of All Kinds Attend- 
ed to 



HARRISON C. REA CO. 

ENGINEERS & CONTRACTORS 

1027 Wood Street 

Philadelphia 



Compliments of 

EDWARD G. MURRAY & CO. 

No. 9 Bank Street 

Both Phone 

S. M. MELZER 

Manufacturer of 

DISPLAY FIXTURES, SHOW 

FORMS, WAX FIGURES, 

BRASS RAILINGS 

915 FILBERT STREET 

Casper B. Tracey, Manager 



O. FUHRMANN 



Birnita IGabirs' Sailor 



1507 North Fifteenth St. 



Compliments of 
P. E. SHARPLESS CO. 
FANCY TABLE BUTTER 

AND CHEESE 

813-819 N. Eleventh St. 

PHILADELPHIA 



Cable Address "Minavet Phila" 

MINARET MILLS 

Successor to Geo. S. Cox & Bro. 
Manufacturers of 
HAIR CLOTH 

CAMBRIA AND ORIVIES STS. 

Philadelphia 



HENRY BELL, President 
HENRY K. WALT, Vice President 
FREEMAN S. HUNSBERGER, 

Treasurer 

BELL, WALT & CO., Inc. 

WHOLESALE 
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 

28 N. THIRD STREET 



EZRA LEVINSON 

Dealer and Jobber in 
—PAPER BAGS— 

For Neckties, Notions, Segars, Etc. 

Printed or Imprinted 

Wrapping Paper in Roll or Sineet 

— Twines for Any Business — 

Envelopes, Toilet Paper, Etc. 

26 SOUTH FIFTH STREET 

Both Phones Phila., Pa. 



Established 1870 

Bell Phone, Market 3319 

Keystone, Main 4225-26-27 

A. F. Bickley & Son 

Wholesale Dealers & Jobbers 
BUTTER, EGGS, CHEESE 

AND POULTRY 

520-22 NORTH SECOND STREET 

Philadelphia 



FREDERICK SflBIN & CO., Ine. 

Howard Miller, President 
HEATING CONTRACTORS 

237-39-41 BREAD STREET 

Philadelphia 



DAWES & POTTEIGER 

PAINTING CONTRACTORS 

Office, 303 Real Estate Trust BIdg. 

Warehouse & Shop, 1628 Cuthbert 
Street Philadelphia 

Member of Master Builders' Ex- 
change. Philadelphia Chamber of 
Commerce. 



O. K. ADDRESSING CO. 



BETZ BUILDING 



CARNWATH, BELL & CO. 

Steam 

Packing Box Manufacturers 

613 and 615 Cherry Street 

608 and 610 Quarry Street 
Telephone Philadelphia 



FHflNK H. STEWART ELECTRIC CO. 

ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 
37 and 39 N. Seventh Street 

Old Mint Building Philadelphia 



Bell Phone, Market 899 

Keystone Phone, Main 170 and 36-36 

Edwin J. Schoettle Co. 

PAPER BOXES AND 
MAILING TUBES 

237 N. SIXTH STREET 

Philadelphia 



Thompson, Taylor & Co. 



Wholesale Grocers 



206 S. Fi-ont St. Philadelphia 



Both Phones 

WILLIAM MEYER 

Nos. 2C6 to 216 QUARRY STREET 

Philadelphia 

STEAM PACKING BOX 

MANUFACTURER 

Carpenter Work, Shelves and 
Fixtures a Specialty. Jobbing in 
all its Branches. 

Corner Bread, Between 2nd and 
3rd, Race and Arch Streets. 



Compliments of 



B. HART, Jr. 



4602 Old York Road 



OLD TIME— HOME MADE 

IVIargaret Penn Candies 

Philadelphia 
Columbia Ave., 1 door East of 
Broad Street 

Branch Store, 143 S. 13th St. 



Compliments 



CHAS. W. YOUNG & CO. 



Philadelphia 



Devoted to Ladies High Class 
Tailoring Exclusively 

Reliable Ladies' Tailoring 
Company 

1223 CHESTNUT STREET 

Opposite ]>niley, ]!anks & I'.iddle Co. 

Philadelphia 
Samuel Hornstein, Prop. 

Bell Phone, Walnut 32-22 



Both Phones Established 1849 

JOSEPH P. WILDE 

Importer of 

CHEESE, DELICACIES & FANCY 

GROCERIES 

Commission Merchant 

825-827 NORTH SECOND STREET 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



H. TOGGWEILER 



Heaters, Ranges, Roofing 



3120 RIDGE AVENUE 



FRANK POEHNER 

FINE BAKERY, ICE CREAM AND 
CONFECTIONERY 

1234 COLUMBIA AVENUE 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



FENNER 
DRUGS 



Broad and Columbia Avenue 



THE PEN-DAR CONSUMER 
A New and Safe Idea 

Made entirely of Galvanized Wire and 
Iron, almost indestructible, used for Burning 
Waste Paper and other combustible material, 
also a neat Basket for Waste Paper, Leaves, 
etc. 

No. I, 20 in. dia. x 30 in. high $3.00 

No. 2, 17 in. dia. x 25 in. high 2.00 

No. 3, 14 in. dia. x 21 in, high 1.80 

No.. 4, 12 in. dia. x 18 in. high 1.50 

We also manufacture Wire Cloth, Wire and 
Iron Work, Wire Garden Furniture, Trellis & 
Flower Bed Border, Lawn and Poultry Fenc- 
ing and Gates. Everything in Wire and Iron 
Pen-Dar Leaf Racks — Used on wheel- 
barrows with removable sides, for 
gathering leaves, cut grass and rub- 
bish ; capacity, 10 bushels; made of 
galvanized wire, bolted to a wooden 
case. Price, (not including wheelbar- 
row) $4.00. "Ask for Catalog of what 
you may want." 

Manufactured by 

¥^ I 1 T\ 1 O C f^ ¥ Address Department 

bdward Darby & 00ns Lo,, inc., 233 4235 Arch street 





Genuine "PHILADELPHIA" Lawn Mowers 

Always have been the Standard of the World 

"Graham" 

All Steel 

For over 44 years the 

"Philadelphia" Lawn Mowers 

have maintained unchallenged 

supremacy amongft Lawn 

Mower Manufacturers 



18 Style High Grade Hand 

Mowers 

6 Style High Grade Horse 
Mowers 

Their New All Steel Mower 
the "Graham" the prefedlion 
of Lawn Mower Construction. 




'GraWam" All Steel 



The Philadelphia Lawn Mower Co. 



Thirty-first and Chestnut Streets 



Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



S. W. Goodman Company 

PRINTERS 

321-323 Cherry Street 
Philadelphia 



Hoffman-Corr Mfg. Co. 

Ask Your Dealer and insist on hav- 
ing your Awnings made from 
HOFFMAN GOLD MEDAL BRAND 

AWNING STRIPES 

Largest Rope and Twine House in 

the World 

CONTRACTORS TO THE 

GOVERNIVIENT 

Philadelphia New York 

312 Market St. 150 Duane St. 



MARGOLIN & BLOCK 



203 South Fifth Steet 



JUNGMANN'S 
BEEF, WINE AND IRON 

%J\J W» None Better 

Jungmann's Drug Store 
FOURTH AND NOBLE STS. 



BANK & OFFICE PARTITIONS 

J0iE.SMi(10ii!,lnc. 

Cabinetmakers 



1719 N. TENTH STREET 

Philadelphia 



BERGER BROS. CO. 

TINNERS' HARDWARE 
AND ROOFERS' SUPPLIES 
237 Arch Street, Phila. 



Bell Phone Keystone Phone 

AUGUST GEIGER 

Heating and Contracting Engineer 
Steam and Hot Water Heating 

114 North Sixth Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Telephone 

CONKLING-ARMSTRONG 
TERRA COTTA CO. 

Manufacturers of 
Architectural Terra Cotta Works 

Philadelphia 
Office: Builders' Exchange, Phila. 



Telephone 

STERN MFG. CO. 

Manufacturers & Jobbers of 

MOVING PICTURE SUPPLIES 

and Stage Lighting Apparatus 

109 N. Tenth Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



HARRY R. RUST 

Manufacturer of 

INTERIOR HARD WOOD FIT- 

INGS, OFFICE AND STORE 

WORK 

Fine Furniture Wood Mantels 

Steam Saw Mill 

724 and 726 LUDLOW STREET 

41 NORTH HUTCHINSON ST. 



Bell Phone, Filbert 4451 



Gittelman's Sons. 



Manufacturers of 



n 



917 ARCH STREET 

Philadelphia, Pa 



TYPEWRITERS 

50 STANDARD MAKES 

L. C. Smiths, Remingtons, Smith- 
Premiers, Olivers & Under- 
woods, from » 

$10.00 to $45.00 

Rebuilt and equal to new, one year 
guarantee 

{^EUT fl TYPEWRITER 
3 Months for $5. 

3 months' rental allowed on pur- 
chase. Rebuilt like new 

Liberty Typewriter Company 
911 Walnut St., Philadelphia 



WRIGLEY'S 
BIG 10 
CLEANER 
BETTER 
CLEANER 
BIGGER CAN 
AT ALL 
GROCERS 




STANTON H. HACKETT 

242 SOUTH SECOND STREET 

Chairs & Mission Furniture 



762 



9i3 



©scar H. fovc S, Son 
MEATS 

STALLS 1234 to 42 READING TERMINAL MARKET 

ARCH STREET FRONT 
Telephone Connection PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



WASHING DAY 



It's wasin- day at our house 
An' this is how I tell: 

It comes right after Sunday 
An' it has a sudsy smell 

An' father's in a hurry 
An' mother's tired out, 

An' every one's jes' awful cross 
An' don't want me about. 

So I take Teddy an' my doll 
An' we go off an' play 

That ev'ry day is Christmas, 
An' the' ain't no washin' day. 



Now my Aunt Jane, she's awful wise 

An' never in a quandry, 
On Monday she makes cakes and pies 

An' wash goes to the laundry. 

"The Excelsior Laundry treats you right! 

Says Aunt Jane to my cousin. 
My linens are so nice and bright 

An' Thirty-five a Dozen. 

An' you'll be pleased, I tell you true 
Send postal, wire or phone 

Nineteenth and Montgomery Avenoo 
An' have some peace at home. 



"IF IT IS GOOD TO EAT WE SELL IT" 

Mondschein's Quality Delicatessen Shop 

SPECIALS IN HOMB-BOILED CORNED BEEF AND TONGUE, NEW 
DILL PICKLES, NEW MATZOS AND HERRING 

Our Potato Salad can't be beat. Try us for all New Things of the Season 
Bell Phone, Tioga 29-89 1619 VENANGO STREET 




-r\ ^~N /-\ r^ 



LIGHTING BY 




ELECTRICITY is safe, economi- 
cal, and convenient when install- 
ed by competent men. Do not 
make the mistake of having the 
cheapest wiring installed. Cheap 
work means future expense, annoy- 
ance and trouble. You will save 
yourself this if you send to 

ALBERT GENTEL, Inc. 

1503 Columbia Ave. 

4466 Germantown Ave. 

Philadelphia 



Compliments of 



HOTEL TRAYMORE 



Atlantic City, N. J. 



C. L. COLES 




H. C. ALBERT & CO. 



APOTHECARIES 



States Avenue and Boardwalk 





Atlantic City, N. J. 


ROYAL PALACE HOTEL 


New Hotel Merion 


Atlantic City, N. J. 


Atlantic City, N. J. 


OPEN ALL YEAR 


Mack Latz & Co. 
VERMONT AVENUE 


SAMUEL HANSTEIN, Proprietor 
LYMAN J. WARTROUS, Manager 


Open all the Year Near the Beacli 



mHilliam (3ovbon 

fllleats, provisions 



1214 Btlantic Hve. 



1701 lPa06^un[^ ave. 



Btlantic Git«, 1R. J. 



lPbilaC>elpbta 



JESSE SHULM AN (EL CO. 



-^ DRESSES -^ 



12 and 14 West 32nd St 



New YorK City 



MAURICE BANDLER 


A. SCHWARTZ & CO. 


Novelties in Ladies Coats 


37-39 West 28th Street 


153 to 159 MADISON AVE. 




New York 


New York 




Mcltman, pollack Si Co. 


ARONSON BROS. 


Cloaks and Suits 


45 AV. 25tli Street 


35 West 33 Street 

New York 




M. WEINSTEIN S CO. 


Compliments 


CLOAKS AND SUITS 


KURZROK BROS. CO. 


135-39 West 26th Street 




New York 


THOMAS H. WILSON 




MANUFACTURER OF FINE WORSTEDS 


Compliments of 


1420-1432 North Howard St. 


DR. ELLIS LEVY 


Philadelphia 




J. SELLERS PENNOCK 


JONATHAN RING & SON 


Sanitary Plumbing 


Incorporated 


and Heating 


Woolen and Merino Yarns 


S. E. Cor. 


Hancock & Montgomery Ave. 


Seventh and Filbert .Streets 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


ppttttByltiama iKtttt (Eflat 


i mifl M [ e nsMDPce Co. 


The Only Knit Sweater Coat 

MADE WITH 


John R. Fox, Supt. 


Notair Buttonholes 


INSURANCE EXPERT 


101042-14 Haee St., Philadelphia 


900 CHESTNUT STREET 




It's predigested food — a 
tonic — a gentle stimulant 
and a smooth, mellow, de- 
lightful beverage. 

If your bottler can't sup- 
ply you, write or 'phone us. ■ "J flCl I 

reminds 



F. A. POTH & SONS, Inc. 
31st and Jefferson Sts. 
Philadelphia 
Keystone, Park 874 

Bell, Poplar 4511-12-13 



me 



9> 




Keystone Phone, Park 4349 D Bell Phone, Tioga 74-20 

MURRELL F. DOBBINS 



r^s^ 



Automobile Repair Shop 

Germantown Avenue and Westmoreland Street 

1 129-31 Roy Street 

Philadelphia 

Stanley Steamers a Specialty STORING AND HIRING 

WAMPOLE'S 

FORMOLID 

(Antiseptic Solution) 
A CONCENTRATED, BUT HARMLESS ANTISEPTIC 



FORMOLID, properly diluted, may be used with perfect 
freedom in the treatment of diseased or inflamed conditions of the 
mucous membrane of the mouth, nose, throat, etc. and as a lotion 
in the treatment of cuts or other abrasions of the skin. 

Excellent as a mouth-wash or gargle. 



PREPARED SOLELY BY 



HENRY K. WAMPOLE & COMPANY 

— ^Incorporated — 

MANUFACTURING PHARMACISTS 

Philadelphia, U. 8. A. 




The Advertising Value of Light 

An Electrically lighted store or place of 
business can be made to stand out as promi- 
nently from its environment as does a mansion 
surrounded by delapidated dwellings. 

It's merely a matter of judicious window 
and exterior lighting. 

Electrical exterior lighting is not illumina- 
tion, it is primarily advertising — first-class, 
business booming publicity which brings large 
returns for a comparatively small expenditure. 

You recognize the up-to-date stores now- 
a-day£ by the extent to which they employ 
electricity! Test that statement by counting 
the successful shops in this city not using Elec- 
tric Light. Ask OS for rates and estimates. 



[THF PHH^pFrrPHTyy ] 



ELECTRIC 



TENTH AND 




COMPANY 



cmstam. sm>.